Healthy Weight Management

Maintaining a healthy weight is important to achieve optimum quality of life, maintain physical functions and reduce medical complications.

Healthy body weight is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2. Overweight is defined as a BMI between 25 and 29.9 kg/m2, and obesity is defined as a BMI >30 kg/m2.

Significant weight loss is defined as a loss of more than 5 percent of body weight during a 30-day period or more than 10 percent of body weight during a 180-day period. It is an important predictor of morbidity and mortality. Weight loss of more than 10 percent of body weight during a 30-day period is considered to represent protein-energy malnutrition. Contributing factors to weight loss must be identified to implement appropriate care.

Significant weight gain occurs when BMI increases from overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2) to obesity (>30 kg/m2). In addition to identifying contributing factors, the person's readiness to change their food intake and change their amount of physical activity must be determined. An individualized plan for weight management includes both caloric reduction and physical activity.

Resources Created By DADS

Resources from Other Organizations

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