Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

Senate Bill 7 from the 83rd Legislature, Regular Session, 2013 required the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) to create the State of Texas Access Reform (STAR) Kids program. STAR Kids is a Medicaid managed care program for children with disabilities in Texas, which integrates acute care and long term services and supports (LTSS) delivered by a managed care organization (MCO).

STAR Kids does not change or impact an individual's Medicaid eligibility, nor does STAR Kids impact access to Medicaid services and supports. STAR Kids does change the way in which services are delivered. Children and young adults, ages birth through 20, enrolled in a STAR Kids MCO are called members of the MCO. All STAR Kids members have access to service coordination, provided by an MCO employee or through a member's primary care provider, authorized by the MCO.

Service coordination is specialized care management performed by a service coordinator and includes but is not limited to:

  • identification of needs, including physical health, behavioral health services, and LTSS development of an individual service plan (ISP) to address those identified needs;
  • assistance to ensure timely and a coordinated access to an array of providers and services;
  • attention to addressing unique needs of members; and
  • coordination of Medicaid benefits with non-Medicaid services and supports, as necessary and appropriate.

All STAR Kids members receive a comprehensive assessment of their physical and functional needs by a service coordinator using the STAR Kids Screening and Assessment Instrument (SK-SAI), annually. Within the time frame listed in the STAR Kids Contract, Section 8.1.39, STAR Kids Initial Screening and Assessment Process, if a member has a significant change in condition, the MCO must reassess the member and update their individual service plan (ISP), as applicable, and authorize necessary services. Upon request from the member, legally authorized representative (LAR), authorized representative (AR) or health home, the MCO must update their ISP, as applicable, and authorize necessary services.

In addition to traditional Medicaid services, STAR Kids MCOs are responsible for delivering additional services to children enrolled in the Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP). MDCP provides respite, flexible family support services, adaptive aids, minor home modifications, employment services and transition assistance to children and young adults who meet the level of care provided in a nursing facility (NF) so they can safely live in the community. The state of Texas appropriates the program a limited number of slots, so HHSC maintains an interest list for MDCP. A child, young adult, LAR or AR may ask their MCO about how to be placed on the MDCP interest list at any time.

 

1100 Legal Basis and Values

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

STAR Kids Medicaid Managed Care Program is required by Texas Government Code, §533.00253. Texas Administrative Code, Title 1, Part 15, Chapter 353, Subchapter M, Home and Community Based Services in Managed Care, and Subchapter N, STAR Kids, outline the delivery of Medically Dependent Children Program services (MDCP), as well as the STAR Kids program. Requirements pertaining to managed care organizations (MCOs) are outlined in the STAR Kids Managed Care Contract and in this handbook.

The STAR Kids Handbook includes policies and procedures to be used by all Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) agencies, and the contractors and providers in the delivery of STAR Kids Program services to eligible members.

 

1110 Mission Statement

Revision 17-1; Effective June 1, 2017

 

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) mission is to provide individually appropriate Medicaid managed care services to children and young adults with disabilities to enable them to live and thrive in a setting that maximizes their health, safety and overall well-being. To achieve HHSC’s mission, the STAR Kids program is established to:

  • coordinate care across service arrays;
  • improve quality, continuity and customization of care;
  • improve access to care and provide person-centered health homes;
  • improve ease of program participation for members, managed care organizations and providers;
  • improve provider collaboration and integration of different services;
  • improve member outcomes to the greatest extent achievable;
  • prepare young adults for the transition to adulthood;
  • foster program innovation; and
  • achieve cost efficiency and cost containment.

 

1200 STAR Kids Services and Service Delivery Options

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

STAR Kids members are entitled to all medically and functionally necessary services available in the same amount, duration and scope as in traditional fee-for-service Medicaid, described in the Texas Medicaid state plan and the Texas Medicaid Provider Procedure Manual (TMPPM) through the member’s selected managed care organization (MCO).

 

1210 Acute Care Services

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

STAR Kids members may receive any medically necessary services through their managed care organization (MCO), and as required under the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT), (42 CFR Part 441). This includes, but is not limited to:

  • ambulance services;
  • audiology services, including hearing aids;
  • behavioral health services, including:
    • in-patient mental health services;
    • out-patient mental health services;
    • out-patient chemical dependency services for children;
    • detoxification services; and
    • psychiatry services;
  • birthing services provided by a certified nurse midwife in a birthing center;
  • chiropractic services;
  • dialysis;
  • durable medical equipment and supplies;
  • emergency services;
  • family planning services;
  • home health care services;
  • hospital services, inpatient;
  • hospital services, out-patient;
  • laboratory;
  • medical checkups and Comprehensive Care Program (CCP) services for children and young adults through the Texas Health Steps Program;
  • oral evaluation and fluoride varnish in conjunction with Texas Health Steps medical checkup for children six months through 35 months of age;
  • optometry, glasses and contact lenses, if medically necessary;
  • podiatry;
  • prenatal care;
  • primary care services;
  • radiology, imaging and X-rays;
  • specialty physician services;
  • therapies, including physical, occupational and speech;
  • transplantation of organs and tissues; and
  • vision services.

STAR Kids members who have other insurance, like Medicare or private insurance, will receive most of their acute care services through their primary insurance. Members receive dental care through their primary insurer, through their selected Medicaid dental maintenance organization (DMO), or through a Medicaid fee-for-service model.

 

1220 Long Term Services and Supports

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

STAR Kids members who have an assessed need for long term services and supports (LTSS), identified by the STAR Kids Screening and Assessment Instrument (SK-SAI), may receive the following services through their STAR Kids managed care organization (MCO):

  • Day activity health services (DAHS) for members age 18 through 20. DAHS includes nursing and personal care services, therapy extension services, nutrition services, transportation services and other supportive services.
  • Personal care services (PCS), which provide assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) and health-related tasks through hands-on assistance, supervision or cueing, including nurse-delegated tasks.
  • Prescribed pediatric extended care center (PPECC), which is a facility that provides nonresidential basic services, including medical, nursing, psychosocial, therapeutic and developmental services to medically dependent or technologically dependent members under the age of 21 up to 12 hours per day.
  • Private duty nursing (PDN) is nursing services for members who meet medical necessity (MN) criteria outlined in the SK-SAI and who require individualized, continuous skilled care beyond the level of skilled nursing visits provided under Texas Medicaid home health services.

STAR Kids members who have an assessed need for LTSS, identified by the SK-SAI and who meet an institutional level of care (LOC), may receive the following service through their STAR Kids MCO.

Community First Choice (CFC), which is available to all STAR Kids members who meet an institutional LOC for a hospital, nursing facility (NF), intermediate care facility for individuals with an intellectual disability or related condition (ICF/IID), or an institution for mental disease. Members enrolled in a waiver program for individuals with an intellectual disability or related condition (ID/RC) receive CFC through their waiver provider. CFC services include:

  • Personal assistance services (PAS), also called CFC-PAS or CFC-personal care services, which provide assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and health-related tasks through hands-on assistance, supervision or cueing, including nurse-delegated tasks.

Note: CFC-PAS is the same service as PCS. The key difference is that CFC-PAS is part of the CFC benefit and must be reported differently. Members may choose to receive CFC-PAS only if they do not need or want CFC habilitation.

  • Habilitation, also called CFC habilitation or CFC-HAB, which provides acquisition, maintenance and enhancement of skills necessary for the member to accomplish ADLs, IADLs and health-related tasks.
  • Emergency response services (ERS), which are back-up systems and supports, including electronic devices with a backup support plan to ensure continuity of services and supports.
  • Support management, which is training provided to members, legally authorized representatives (LARs) or authorized representatives (ARs) on how to manage and dismiss their attendants.

STAR Kids members enrolled in the Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) are eligible for additional services through their MCO as a cost-effective alternative to living in an NF. Receipt of MDCP services does not impact a member's eligibility for other LTSS available in STAR Kids. Additional services available to STAR Kids members in MDCP are:

  • Adaptive aids, which are needed to treat, rehabilitate, prevent or compensate for a condition that results in a disability or a loss of function and helps a member perform the ADLs or control the environment in which they live. Adaptive aids must only be authorized after exhausting all Medicaid state plan services and other third-party resources.
  • Employment assistance, which is assistance provided to a member to help the member locate paid, competitive employment in the community.
  • Financial management services (FMS) for members who choose the Consumer Directed Services (CDS) option. FMS provides assistance to members with managing funds associated with the services elected for self-direction. The service includes initial orientation and ongoing training related to responsibilities of being an employer and adhering to legal requirements for employers.
  • Flexible family support services are direct care services needed because of a member's disability that help a member participate in child care, post-secondary education, employment, independent living, or support a member's move to an independent living situation.
  • Minor home modifications are physical changes to a member's residence that are needed to prevent institutionalization or to support the most integrated setting for a member to remain in the community.
  • Respite services are direct care services needed because of a member's disability that provides a primary caregiver temporary relief from caregiving activities when the primary caregiver would usually perform such activities.
  • Supported employment provides assistance to sustain paid, competitive employment to a member who, because of a disability, requires intensive, ongoing support to be self-employed, work from home, or perform in a work setting at which members without disabilities are employed.
  • Transition assistance services are a one-time service provided to a Medicaid-eligible resident of an NF located in Texas to assist the resident in moving from the NF into the community to receive MDCP services.

 

1230 Service Delivery Options for Certain Long Term Services and Supports

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

STAR Kids provides members with an array of services, as identified on the individual service plan (ISP). Services are delivered by providers contracted with managed care organizations (MCOs) to provide those services. The MCO completes all initial and annual service planning activities, and verifies, authorizes, coordinates and monitors services.

STAR Kids members may choose from three service delivery options for the delivery of certain long term services and supports (LTSS). The options are agency, service responsibility, and consumer directed. State plan LTSS which can be delivered through these service delivery options are:

  • Community First Choice habilitation (CFC-HAB);
  • Community First Choice personal assistance services (CFC-PAS); and
  • Personal care services (PCS).

STAR Kids members receiving Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) services may choose from these service delivery options for the following services:

  • Employment assistance;
  • Flexible family support services;
  • Respite; and
  • Supported employment.

STAR Kids members, legally authorized representatives (LARs) or authorized representatives (ARs) may choose to participate in the agency option, consumer directed services (CDS) or service responsibility option (SRO) delivery models. Members who choose the agency model select an MCO-contracted agency to coordinate service delivery for the services on their ISP. Members who choose CDS are given the authority to self-direct certain services. If the member chooses to self-direct certain services, the MCO coordinates delivery of non-member directed services.

In the SRO model, an agency is the attendant's employer and handles the business details (for example, paying taxes and doing the payroll). The agency also orients attendants to agency policies and standards before sending them to the member’s home. The member, LAR or AR is responsible for most of the day-to-day management of the attendant's activities, beginning with interviewing and selecting the person who will be the attendant.

In the CDS model, the member, LAR or AR with assistance from a financial management service agency (FMSA), ensures all supplies necessary to provide all authorized services. These personnel may be employed directly by or through personal service agreements or subcontracts with the providers.

More information about these service delivery options is available in Section 5000, Service Delivery Options.

 

1300 Service Coordination

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

All STAR Kids members have access to service coordination from their managed care organization (MCO). The MCO may employ service coordinators, but may also enter into an arrangement with an integrated health home that offers service coordinators to provide some service coordination functions through the member's health home. To integrate the member’s care while remaining informed of the member’s needs and condition, the service coordinator must actively involve the member’s primary and specialty care providers, including behavioral health service providers, and providers of non-capitated services and non-covered services. When members, legally authorized representatives (LARs) or authorized representatives (ARs) request information regarding a referral to a nursing or other long-term care facility, the service coordinator must inform the member, LAR or AR about options available through home and community based services (HCBS) programs, in addition to facility-based options.

MCO service coordinators are responsible for assessing a member's needs using the STAR Kids Screening and Assessment Instrument (SK-SAI), developing an individual service plan (ISP) for every member, and authorizing services identified on the ISP. During the annual face-to-face visit, the service coordinator must:

  • Review the member’s current short-term and long-term goals and objectives, as documented in the ISP;
  • Acknowledge and document goals and objectives the member has achieved or with which the member has made progress;
  • Acknowledge and document goals and objectives that may need to be adjusted;
  • Develop new goals and objectives with input from the member, member’s family and member’s providers;
  • Update the member’s ISP;
  • Assist with development and management of the ISP and budget for members receiving Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) services;
  • Inform members receiving long term services and supports (LTSS) about the consumer directed services (CDS) and service responsibility options (SROs);
  • Educate the member, LAR or AR about his or her rights regarding acts that constitute Abuse or Neglect (Child Protective Services) and Abuse, Neglect or Exploitation (Adult Protective Services); and
  • Review member rights and MCO processes for service authorization, appeals and complaints.

 

1310 Service Coordination Requirements

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

Managed care organizations (MCOs) provide a different level of service coordination, depending on a member's needs. Members with more complex needs receive more service coordination than members whose needs are less complex.

Members with the highest needs are designated as Level 1 members in the STAR Kids Managed Care Contract. These members receive a minimum of four face-to-face visits from a named service coordinator annually, in addition to monthly phone calls, unless otherwise requested by a member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR). Level 1 service coordinators must be a registered nurse (RN), nurse practitioner (NP), a physician's assistant (PA), a social worker (MSW, LCSW, or LBSW) or licensed professional counselor (LPC) if the member's service needs are primarily behavioral. Level 1 members include those who:

  • Are enrolled in the Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) or Youth Empowerment Services (YES) program;
  • Have complex needs or a history of developmental or behavioral health issues (multiple outpatient visits, hospitalization or institutionalization within the past year);
  • Are diagnosed with severe emotional disturbance (SED) or serious and persistent mental illness (SPMI); or
  • Are at risk for institutionalization.

Level 2 members have specialized needs that are less complex than Level 1 members. Level 2 members receive a minimum of two face-to-face visits and six telephonic contacts annually from a named service coordinator, unless otherwise requested by the member, LAR or AR. Level 2 service coordinators must be either an RN, NP, PA, have an undergraduate or graduate degree in social work or a related field, or be a licensed vocational nurse (LVN) with previous service coordination or case management experience. Level 2 members include members who:

  • do not meet the requirements for Level 1 but receive long term services and supports (LTSS);
  • the MCO believes would benefit from a higher level of service coordination based on results from the STAR Kids Screening and Assessment Instrument (SK-SAI) and additional MCO findings;
  • have a history of substance abuse (multiple outpatient visits, hospitalization or institutionalization within the past year); or
  • are without SED or SPMI, but who have another behavioral health condition that significantly impairs function.

Level 3 members have fewer needs than Level 2 members. MCOs are required to provide Level 3 members with one face-to-face visit, in which the SK-SAI is completed, and make three telephonic contacts annually, at minimum. Level 3 service coordinators must have a minimum of a high school diploma or a general education diploma (GED) and direct experience working with children and young adults with similar conditions or behaviors in three of the last five years.

Members receiving Level 1 or Level 2 service coordination must have a single, named person as their assigned service coordinator. Level 3 members, LARs or ARs may request a single named service coordinator by calling the service coordination hotline on the back of their STAR Kids member ID card. In addition, the MCO must provide a named service coordinator for members who qualify for Level 3 who reside in a nursing facility or community-based intermediate care facility for individuals with an intellectual disability or related conditions (ICF/IID) or who are served by one of the following non-capitated 1915(c) waivers: Community Living Assistance and Support Services (CLASS), Deaf Blind with Multiple Disabilities (DBMD), Home and Community-based Services (HCS) or Texas Home Living (TxHmL). The MCO must notify members within five business days of the name and phone number of the new service coordinator, if the service coordinator changes.

MCOs must notify all members in writing of the:

  • name of the service coordinator;
  • phone number of the service coordinator;
  • minimum number of contacts they will receive every year; and
  • types of contacts they will receive.

 

1320 Service Coordination and Programs Serving Members with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Members who have intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) living in a community-based intermediate care facility for individuals with an intellectual disability or related conditions (ICF/IID), or who receive services through one of the following IDD waivers, receive their acute care services and some long term services supports (LTSS) (e.g., private duty nursing (PDN)) through STAR Kids and continue to receive most of their LTSS through the following programs:

  • Community Living Assistance and Support Services (CLASS);
  • Deaf Blind with Multiple Disabilities (DBMD);
  • Home and Community-based Services (HCS);
  • Texas Home Living (TxHmL); or
  • Community ICF/IIDs.

Members with IDD that meet the above criteria have a named managed care organization (MCO) service coordinator. The number of required service coordination visits or telephone calls and level of service coordination varies by acuity and the member’s, legally authorized representative’s (LAR’s) or authorized representative’s (AR’s) personal preference.

These members also have a person(s) outside of the MCO who develops and implements a service plan and monitors LTSS service delivery. The MCO service coordinator must respond to requests from the member's waiver case manager or service coordinator. The member’s waiver case manager or service coordinator should invite MCO service coordinators to their care planning meetings or other interdisciplinary team meetings, as long as the member does not object. These meetings are not mandatory but are strongly recommended and participation may be in person or telephonically. The MCO service coordinator is responsible for the coordination of these members’ acute care services and capitated LTSS.

 

1330 Service Coordination and the Youth Empowerment Services Program

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Members who receive services through the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) program receive their acute care services and some long term services and supports (LTSS) (e.g., day activity and health services (DAHS), private duty nursing (PDN), and Community First Choice (CFC)) only through STAR Kids and continue to receive their waiver services through the YES program. Members served by the YES program will have a named managed care organization (MCO) service coordinator and will be considered Level 1 members.

These members also have a case manager outside of the MCO who develops and implements a YES service plan and monitors waiver service delivery. This case management is provided through the capitated Mental Health Targeted Case Management (MH TCM) benefit, which the MCO must authorize for any member receiving YES. The MCO service coordinator must respond to requests from the member's waiver case manager. The member’s waiver case manager should invite MCO service coordinators to the care planning meetings or other interdisciplinary team meetings, as long as the member does not object. These meetings are not mandatory but are strongly recommended and participation may be either in person or telephonically. The MCO service coordinator is responsible for the coordination of these member's acute care services and capitated long term services and supports.

 

1340 Service Coordinators and Home and Community Based Services - Adult Mental Health

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2017

 

The Home and Community Based Services - Adult Mental Health (HCBS-AMH) program serves members who have serious and persistent mental illness (SPMI) and:

  • a history of extended (three cumulative or consecutive years of the past five) institutional stays in psychiatric facilities;
  • severe mental illness (SMI) and frequent visits to the emergency department; and
  • SMI and frequent arrests and stays in a correctional facility.

HCBS-AMH provides an array of enhanced community-based services, including residential assistance, targeted to the program's population. HCBS-AMH is operated on a fee-for-service basis for members age 18 and up. Each participant is assigned a recovery manager (RM) who monitors and coordinates HCBS-AMH services through recovery plan meetings. Members enrolled in HCBS-AMH receive their acute care services through their managed care organization (MCO) and their enhanced community-based services from providers contracted with the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS). Additional information about HCBS-AMH can be found at https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/mhsa/hcbs-amh/.

Program Point of Contact

Each managed care organization (MCO) must have a designated program point of contact (PPOC) for the AMH program. The PPOC is responsible for the following:

  • Ensuring MCO service coordinators are aware of HCBS-AMH services offered and their coordination responsibilities; and
  • Responding within three business days to concerns from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) or recovery managers (RMs) to mitigate any issues with service coordination including uncooperative MCO service coordinators, missed teleconferences, or other concerns regarding MCO participation in the AMH program.

MCO Service Coordination Responsibility

MCO service coordinators must participate in telephonic recovery plan meetings, as scheduled by HHSC or RMs, and provide any requested member-specific information prior to the meeting. Service coordinators must:

  • Send requested information to the RM or HHSC three business days prior to the scheduled recovery plan meeting. This information includes, but is not limited to the following:
    • Updating the member’s condition;
    • Sharing relevant authorizations, such as an authorization or provider contact information when an HCBS-AMH member receives Community First Choice (CFC) services;
    • Upcoming MCO service coordinator face-to-face appointments and/or scheduled dates for telephonic contacts with the member; and
    • Relevant member treatment documents as requested by the RM or HHSC.
  • Respond to ad-hoc requests from the RM or HHSC with "urgent" in the subject line within one business day.
  • Respond to non-urgent ad-hoc requests in a timely manner.
  • Coordinate with HHSC and the RM when a member transitions into or out of HCBS-AMH.

HCBS-AMH may provide transitional planning for members who reside in an institution and also enrolled in a STAR Kids MCO. MCO service coordinators must participate in planning meetings with the RM, telephonically or in-person, during the member's stay. Planning meetings focus on coordination of services upon discharge from the inpatient psychiatric institution. MCO service coordinators are responsible for providing the RM requested treatment information for transition planning purposes. STAR Kids MCOs must follow all discharge planning requirements, as outlined in the STAR Kids Managed Care Contract, Section 8.1.38.10.

 

1350 Service Coordinators and the Section 811 Project Rental Assistance Program

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

This section is reserved for future use.

 

1400 Medically Dependent Children Program

 

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) is a home and community based services (HCBS) program authorized under §1915(c) of the Social Security Act. MDCP provides respite, flexible family support services, minor home modifications, adaptive aids, transition assistance services, employment assistance, supported employment and financial management services through a STAR Kids managed care organization (MCO). This section provides an overview of MDCP, including its eligibility requirements.

 

1410 MDCP Program Goal

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The goal of the Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) is to support families caring for children and young adults age 20 and younger who are medically dependent, and to encourage de-institutionalization of children and young adults who reside in nursing facilities (NFs).

MDCP accomplishes this goal by:

  • enabling children and young adults who are medically dependent to remain safely in their homes;
  • offering cost-effective alternatives to placement in NFs and hospitals; and
  • supporting families in the role as the primary caregiver for their children and young adults who are medically dependent.

 

1500 Medically Dependent Children Program Eligibility

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

Individuals become eligible to be assessed for Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) services when their names come to the top of the MDCP interest list. Individuals may be placed on the interest list on a first come, first served basis by contacting the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) or their managed care organization (MCO) if they are already enrolled in STAR Kids. Once an individual's name comes to the top of the list, determination of eligibility begins as the individual applies for services. Individuals not already enrolled in STAR Kids are referred to as applicants. Individuals enrolled in STAR Kids who are assessed for MDCP are referred to as members.

MDCP is provided by virtue of authority granted to the state of Texas to allow delivery of long term services and supports (LTSS) that assist members to live in the community in lieu of a nursing facility (NF). To be eligible for services under the MDCP waiver, the applicant or member must meet the following criteria:

  • medical necessity (MN) for an NF level of care (LOC);
  • have an individual service plan (ISP) with services under the established cost limit;
  • be birth through age 20;
  • be a United States citizen and Texas resident;
  • be in an appropriate living situation; and
  • have full Medicaid eligibility.

 

1510 Medical Necessity Determination

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

A Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) waiver applicant or member must have a valid medical necessity (MN) determination before admission into the MDCP waiver. The determination of MN is based on a completed STAR Kids Screening and Assessment Instrument (SK-SAI). The applicant's or member's individual service plan (ISP) cost limit is calculated based on information gathered through the SK-SAI MDCP module.

The managed care organization (MCO) completes and submits the SK-SAI to Texas Medicaid & Healthcare Partnership (TMHP) for MDCP applicants/members. TMHP processes the SK-SAI for applicants or members to determine MN and calculate a Resource Utilization Group (RUG). A RUG is a measure of nursing facility (NF) staffing intensity and is used in waiver programs to categorize needs for applicants or members and establish the service plan cost limit.

When TMHP processes an SK-SAI, a three-alphanumeric digit RUG is generated and appears in the TMHP Long Term Care (LTC) Online Portal as well as the MCO's response file. An SK-SAI with incomplete RUG information results in a "BC1" code instead of a RUG value. An SK-SAI resulting in a BC1 code does not have all of the information necessary for TMHP to accurately calculate a RUG for the member. Code BC1 is not a valid RUG to determine MDCP eligibility.

The MCO must correct the information on the SK-SAI within 14 days of submitting the assessment that resulted in a BC1 code. The MCO nurse must also submit any corrections to SK-SAI items used to determine MN within 14 days. After 14 days, the MCO must inactivate the SK-SAI and resubmit the assessment with correct information to TMHP. See Appendix I, MCO Business Rules for SK-SAI and SK-ISP, for detailed instructions pertaining to communicating corrections and inactivations to the SK-SAI to TMHP.

 

1511 Medical Necessity Determination for Applicants/Members Residing in Nursing Facilities

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

During initial contact with the applicant or member, the service coordinator must explore the applicant’s or member's status in the nursing facility (NF) and desire to transition to the community. The service coordinator completes the STAR Kids Screening and Assessment Instrument (SK-SAI) and submits the assessment to Texas Medicaid & Healthcare Partnership (TMHP) indicating a request for a determination of medical necessity. This process is described in more detail in Appendix I, MCO Business Rules for SK-SAI and SK-ISP.

 

1512 Medical Necessity Determination for Applicants/Members Not Residing in Nursing Facilities

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

For applicants or members not living in nursing facilities (NFs), the medical necessity (MN) determination is made by Texas Medicaid & Healthcare Partnership (TMHP) based on the STAR Kids Screening and Assessment Instrument (SK-SAI) completed by the managed care organization (MCO) selected by the applicant or member.

The MCO must electronically submit the SK-SAI to TMHP indicating a request for MN determination after obtaining a physician signature using Form 2601, Physician Certification. The SK-SAI and Form 2601 must be retained in the MCO’s records.

 

1520 Individual Cost Limit

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The cost of Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) services cannot exceed 50 percent of the cost of care the state would pay if the member was served in a nursing facility (NF). For initial eligibility, the MDCP applicant must have an individual service plan (ISP) of MDCP services developed that is at or below 50 percent of the cost to provide services to that applicant, based on the Resource Utilization Group (RUG) in a nursing facility.

For initial applications, the total cost of services for an applicant's MDCP services ISP must be equal to or below the applicant’s ISP cost limit. Applicants exceeding the cost limit cannot elect to receive reduced services for entry to the program if the Medicaid state plan services and the MDCP services would pose a risk to the individual's health, safety and welfare.

 

1530 Unmet Need for at Least One Waiver Service

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

The 1915(c) Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) waiver specifies that individuals must have a need for at least one MDCP service to receive MDCP waiver services. For initial and continued eligibility for the MDCP, a member must have an unmet need for, and therefore use, at least one MDCP service during the individual service plan (ISP) year. Therefore, an MDCP ISP which has $0.00 as the “Total Est. Waiver Cost” at the bottom of Form 2604, STAR Kids Individual Service Plan – Service Tracking Tool, will be rejected. Members who do not use at least one MDCP service per ISP year are subject to disenrollment from the waiver. For members without Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (i.e., medical assistance only (MAO) members), disenrollment from the MDCP waiver may result in a loss of Medicaid eligibility.

Individuals certified for medical assistance only (MAO) Medicaid by the Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) receiving Community First Choice (CFC) services through a 1915(c) waiver program must meet eligibility requirements stated in 42 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §441.510(d). This CFR rule mandates that individuals who qualify for MAO Medicaid must meet all MDCP waiver requirements and also must receive one MDCP waiver service per month.

 

1540 Age

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

To be eligible to participate in the Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP), an applicant or member must be under age 21.

 

1550 Citizenship

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

As part of Public Law 109-171, Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, each U.S. citizen eligible for Medicaid is required to provide proof of U.S. citizenship and identity. This requirement affects all long term services and supports (LTSS) members whose financial eligibility is based on a determination from Medicaid for the Elderly and People with Disabilities (MEPD) specialists. MEPD specialists also verify an applicant is a Texas resident.

 

1560 Living Arrangement

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Managed care organization (MCO) service coordinators must confirm that the applicant or member, if under age 18, lives with a family member such as a parent, guardian, grandparent or sibling, as defined in the Glossary. The MCO service coordinator must review guardianship documentation or obtain a statement from the applicant, member, legally authorized representative (LAR), authorized representative (AR) or family member regarding relation. The service coordinator must maintain this documentation in the member's case file.

 

1570 Financial Eligibility

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

Applicants or members who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are already eligible for Medicaid and will not require a financial or Medicaid eligibility decision. The Social Security Administration (SSA) has already made this determination. Program Support Unit (PSU) staff must determine if an applicant or member is currently on Medicaid.

 

1600 Disclosure of Information

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

 

1610 Confidential Nature of a Case Record

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Information collected in determining initial or continuing eligibility is confidential. The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the managed care organization (MCO) may disclose general information about policies, procedures or other methods of determining eligibility, and any other information that is not about or does not specifically identify a member. A member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) may review all information in the case record and in HHSC or MCO handbooks that contributed to the decision about eligibility.

 

1611 Establishing Identity for Contact Outside the Interview Process

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

All information that the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the managed care organization (MCO) have about a member or any individual on the member's case must be kept confidential. Confidential information includes, but is not limited to, a member's name, date of birth (DOB), address, Social Security number (SSN), Medicaid ID number or any other personally identifiable health information.

Before discussing or releasing information about a member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) on the member's case, take steps to be reasonably sure the individual receiving the confidential information is either the member, LAR or AR  authorized to receive confidential information (for example, an attorney).

 

1611.1 Telephone Contact

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Establish the identity of an individual who identifies himself or herself as a member by using the individual’s knowledge of any of the following:

  • member’s Social Security number (SSN) and date of birth (DOB);
  • member’s SSN and answer to a security question;
  • member’s DOB and answer to a security question; or
  • answers to two security questions.

Establish the identity of a legally authorized representation (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) by using the individual's knowledge of any of the above or the any of the following:

  • LAR’s or AR’s SSN and DOB;
  • LAR’s or AR’s SSN and answer to a security question;
  • LAR’s or AR’s DOB and answer to a security question; or
  • answers to two security questions.

Establish the identity of an attorney, LAR or AR by asking for the individual to provide Form 1826-D, Case Information Release, completed and signed by the member. The managed care organization (MCO) must maintain this documentation in the member's case file.

Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) staff must use established regional procedures to confirm the identity of legislators or their staff. The MCO must use established HHSC procedures to confirm the identity of legislators or its staff.

 

1611.2 In-Person Contact

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Establish the identity of the individual who presents himself or herself as a member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) at a Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) or managed care organization (MCO) office by examining:

  • at least one form of government-issued photo identification:
    • Valid U.S. passport;
    • driver license or Department of Public Safety Identification card; or
    •  state agency employee badge; and
  • at least two forms of other identification:
    • Social Security number (SSN) card;
    • hospital record;
    • work or school identification card;
    • voter registration card; or
    • wage stub.

Establish the identity of other HHSC or MCO staff, federal agency staff, researchers or contractors by examining at least one source such as:

  • employee badge; or
  • government-issued identification card with a photograph.

Identify the need for other HHSC or MCO staff, federal staff, research staff or contractors to access confidential information through one of the following:

  • official correspondence or a telephone call from a state or regional office; or
  • contact with an HHSC attorney.

Contact appropriate regional or state office staff when federal agency staff, contractors, researchers or other HHSC or MCO staff come to the office without prior notification or adequate identification and request permission to access records.

Refer to Section 1611.3, Verification and Documentation, if the individual is requesting personally identifiable information (PII) or protected health information (PHI).

 

1611.3 Verification and Documentation

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

It is only acceptable to disclose personally identifiable information (PII) or protected health information (PHI) to the applicant, member, legally authorized representative (LAR), authorized representative (AR) or a third-party to whom the applicant, member, LAR or AR have provided written consent for the release of PII or PHI information. If disclosing PII or PHI, document transactions and maintain documentation in the member's case file pertaining to how the identity of the person was verified when contact is outside the interview and the method of how the information was released to the individual.

Verify the identity of the person who requests disclosure of PII or PHI by examining:

  • at least one form of government-issued photo identification:
    • Valid U.S. passport;
    • driver license or Department of Public Safety Identification card; or
    •  state agency employee badge; and
  • at least two forms of other identification:
    • Social Security number (SSN) card;
    • hospital record;
    • work or school identification card;
    • voter registration card; or
    • wage stub.

 

1612 Custody of Records

Revision 17-1; Effective June 1, 2017

 

Records must be safeguarded. Use reasonable diligence to protect and preserve records and to prevent disclosure of the information they contain, except as provided by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and managed care organization (MCO) regulations.

Reasonable diligence for employees responsible for records includes keeping records:

  • in a locked office when the building is closed;
  • properly filed during office hours; and
  • in the office at all times, except when authorized to remove or transfer them.

 

1613 Disposal of Records

Revision 17-1; Effective June 1, 2017

 

To dispose of documents with member-specific information, Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) staff must follow established procedures for destruction of confidential data. Managed care organizations (MCOs) must follow procedures contained in Section 7.06 of the STAR Kids Managed Care Contract.

 

1614 When and What Information May Be Disclosed

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Reasonable effort must be made to limit the use, request or disclosure of individually identifiable health information to the minimum necessary to determine eligibility and operate the program. The disclosure of individual medical information from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and managed care organization (MCO) records must be limited to the minimum necessary to accomplish the requested disclosure. For example, if a member authorizes release of income verification, including disability income, do not release related case medical information unless specifically authorized by the member.

Give member addresses or other case information only to a person who has written permission from the applicant, member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) to obtain the information. The applicant, member, LAR or AR authorizes the release of information by completing and signing:

  • Form 1826-D, Case Information Release; or
  • a document containing all of the following information:
    • the applicant's or member's:
      • full name (including middle initial) and Medicaid identification number; or
      • full name (including middle initial) and either date of birth (DOB) or Social Security number (SSN);
    • a description of the information to be released. Note: If a general release is authorized, provide the information that can be disclosed to the member, LAR or AR. Withhold confidential information from the case record, such as names of persons who disclosed information about the household without the household's knowledge, and the nature of pending criminal prosecution;
    • a statement specifically authorizing HHSC or the MCO to release the information;
    • the name of the person or agency to whom the information will be released;
    • the purpose of the release;
    • an expiration event that is related to the member, the purpose of the release or an expiration date of the release;
    • a statement about whether refusal to sign the release affects eligibility for delivery of services;
    • a statement describing the applicant's or member's right to revoke the authorization to release information;
    • the date the document is signed; and
    • the signature of the applicant, member, LAR or AR.

Note: If the case information to be released includes individually identifiable health information, the document must also tell the applicant, member, LAR or AR that information released under the document may no longer be private, and may be released further by the person receiving the information.

Occasionally, requests for information from the case records of deceased members are received. In these instances, protect the confidentiality of the former members and their survivors.

The Office of the Chief Counsel at HHSC handles questions about the release of information. All questions and problems encountered by individuals concerning release of information should be referred to this office. MCO staff should email HPM_Complaints@hhsc.state.tx.us.

 

1615 Confidential Nature of Medical Information ─ Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is a federal law that sets additional standards to protect the confidentiality of individually identifiable health information. Individually identifiable health information is information that identifies or could be used to identify an applicant or member and that relates to the:

  • past, present or future physical or behavioral health or condition of the applicant or member;
  • provision of health care to the applicant or member; or
  • past, present or future payment for the provision of health care to the applicant or member.

Protected health information (PHI) includes, but is not limited to, an individual's name, date of birth (DOB), address, Social Security number (SSN), Medicaid ID number or any other personally identifiable information (PII).

 

1616 Privacy Notice

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and managed care organization (MCO) staff must send each member the Texas Health and Human Services Agencies' Notice of Privacy Practices at https://hhs.texas.gov/health-and-human-services-agencies-notice-privacy-practices, upon certification. This notice tells the member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) about:

  • member privacy rights;
  • the duties of HHSC and the MCO to protect health information (PHI); and
  • how HHSC and the MCO may use or disclose health information without member authorization. Examples of use or disclosure include health care operations (e.g., Medicaid), public health purposes, reporting victims of abuse, law enforcement purposes, sharing with HHSC or MCO contractors and coordinating government programs that provide benefits.

 

1617 Member Authorization

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) may authorize the release of health information from Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and managed care organization (MCO) records by using a valid authorization form. Form 1826-D, Case Information Release, includes all the authorization elements required by Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) privacy regulations.

 

1618 Minimum Necessary Information Release

Revision 17-1; Effective June 1, 2017

 

Reasonable efforts must be made to limit the use, request or disclosure of individually identifiable health information to the minimum necessary to determine eligibility and operate the program. The disclosure of individual medical information from Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and managed care organization (MCO) records must be limited to the minimum necessary to accomplish the requested disclosure. For example, if a member authorizes release of income verification, including disability income, do not release related case medical information unless specifically authorized by the member.

 

1619 Legally Authorized Representatives and Authorized Representatives

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Only the member's legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) can exercise the member's rights with respect to individually identifiable health information. Therefore, only a member's personal representative may authorize the use or disclosure of individually identifiable health information or obtain individually identifiable health information on behalf of a member. Exception: Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the managed care organization (MCO) are not required to disclose the information to the personal representative if the member is subjected to domestic violence, abuse or neglect by the personal representative. Consult appropriate legal counsel, as described in Section 1614, When and What Information May Be Disclosed, if it is believed that health information should not be released to the LAR or AR.

Note: A responsible party is not automatically an LAR or AR.

 

1619.1 Adults and Emancipated Minors

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

If the member is an adult or emancipated minor, including married minors, the member's LAR or AR is a person who has the authority to make health care decisions about the member and includes a:

  • person the member has appointed under a medical power of attorney, a durable power of attorney with the authority to make health care decisions, or a power of attorney with the authority to make health care decisions;
  • court-appointed guardian for the member; or
  • person designated by law to make health care decisions when the member is in a hospital or nursing home and is incapacitated or mentally or physically incapable of communication.

Consult appropriate legal counsel, as described in Section 1614, When and What Information May Be Disclosed, for approval.

 

1619.2 Unemancipated Minors

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

A parent is the LAR or AR for a minor child except when:

  • the minor child can consent to medical treatment by himself or herself. Under these circumstances, do not disclose to a parent information about the medical treatment to which the minor child can consent. A minor child can consent to medical treatment by himself or herself when the:
    • minor is on active duty with the U.S. military;
    • minor is age 16 years or older, lives separately from the parents and manages his own financial affairs;
    • consent involves diagnosis and treatment of disease that must be reported to the local health officer or the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS);
    • minor is unmarried and pregnant and the treatment (other than abortion) relates to the pregnancy;
    • minor is age 16 years or older and the consent involves examination and treatment for drug or chemical addiction, dependency or use at a treatment facility licensed by DSHS;
    • consent involves examination and treatment for drug or chemical addiction, dependency or use by a physician or counselor at a location other than a treatment facility licensed by the state of Texas;
    • minor is unmarried, is the parent of a child, has actual custody of the child and consents to treatment for the child; or
    • consent involves suicide prevention or sexual, physical or emotional abuse.
  • a court is making health care decisions for the minor child or has given the authority to make health care decisions for the minor child to an adult other than a parent or to the minor child. Under these circumstances, do not disclose to a parent information about health care decisions not made by the parent.

 

1619.3 Deceased Members

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The LAR or AR for a deceased member is an executor, administrator or other person with authority to act on behalf of the member or the member's estate. These include:

  • an executor, including an independent executor;
  • an administrator, including a temporary administrator;
  • a surviving spouse;
  • a child;
  • a parent; and
  • an heir.

Consult appropriate legal counsel, as described in Section 1614, When and What Information May Be Disclosed, about whether a particular person is the personal representative of an applicant or member.

 

1620 Confidential Information on Notifications

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) is committed to protecting all confidential information supplied by the applicant, member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) during the eligibility determination process. This includes inclusion of confidential information by HHSC staff to third parties who receive a copy of a notification of eligibility form.

Staff must ensure they do not include confidential information on the eligibility notice that should not be shared with the service provider or another third party.

Examples:

  • Notification is received from Medicaid for the Elderly and People with Disabilities (MEPD) that the member has lost Medicaid because his income of $2,892 exceeds the eligibility limit of $2,022. It is a violation of confidentiality to record on Form H2065-D, Notification of Managed Care Program Services, "Your income of $2,892 exceeds the eligibility limit of $2,022." The comment should simply state, "You are no longer eligible for Medicaid."
  • Another applicant is being denied Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) services because the presence of weapons in his home presents a hazard to service providers. It is a violation of confidentiality to record on Form H2065-D, "The presence of weapons in your home presents a hazard to service providers." The comment should simply state, "Your services are being denied due to hazardous conditions in your home."

In the examples above, revealing specifics of the member’s income or the condition of his home environment is a violation of his right to confidentiality. In all cases, HHSC staff must assess any information provided by the individual to determine if its release would be a confidentiality violation.

 

1630 Correcting Information

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

A member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) has a right to correct any information that the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) or the managed care organization (MCO) has about the member and any other individual on the member's case.

A request for correction must be in writing and:

  • identify the individual asking for the correction;
  • identify the disputed information about the individual;
  • state why the information is wrong;
  • include any proof that shows the information is wrong;
  • state what correction is requested; and
  • include a return address, telephone number or email address at which HHSC or the MCO can contact the member.

If HHSC or the MCO agrees to change individually identifiable health information, the corrected information is added to the case record, but the incorrect information remains in the file with a note that the information was amended per the member's request.

Notify the member, LAR or AR in writing within 60 days (using current agency letterhead) that the information is corrected, or will not be corrected, and the reason. Inform the member if HHSC or the MCO needs to extend the 60-day period by an additional 30 days to complete the correction process or obtain additional information.

If HHSC or the MCO makes a correction to individually identifiable health information, HHSC or the MCO must ask the member for permission before sharing with third parties. The agency will make a reasonable effort to share the correct information with persons who received the incorrect information if they may have relied or could rely on it to the disadvantage of the member. HHSC staff must follow regional procedures to contact the HHSC privacy officer for a record of disclosures. MCOs must follow HHSC procedures as stated in the STAR Kids Managed Care Contract.

Note: Do not follow above procedures when the accuracy of information provided by a member, LAR or AR is determined by another review process, such as a:

  • fair hearing;
  • civil rights hearing; or
  • other appeal process.

The decision in that review process is the decision on the request to correct information.

 

1640 Communication with the Managed Care Organization

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

In order to comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), it is imperative for a member's individually identifiable health information to be shared only with his or her selected managed care organization (MCO). This makes it crucial that when documents containing member information are posted in the incorrect MCO folder in TxMedCentral, they be corrected immediately upon realization an error was made.

Send notification of all posting errors to Program Support Unit (PSU) Operations staff. Include the document identifying information, the name of the folder in which it was erroneously posted and the name of the folder into which it should have been posted. Include the time the correction was made.

Example: Posted XX_2067_123456789_ABCD_IM_MFP.doc in SUPSKW at 8:54 a.m. on December 20. Should have been posted to MOLSKW. Corrected at 9:22 a.m. December 20.

All emails containing member information must be sent using encryption software. No personally identifiable information (PII) may appear in the subject line. See also Section 1615, Confidential Nature of Medical Information, and Section 5100, Agency Option (AO).

 

1650 Alternate Means of Communication

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the managed care organization (MCO) must accommodate an applicant’s, member's, legally authorized representative’s (LAR’s) or authorized representative’s (AR’s) reasonable requests to receive communications by alternative means or at alternate locations.

The applicant, member, LAR or AR must specify in writing the alternate mailing address or means of contact, and include a statement that using the home mailing address or normal means of contact could endanger the member.

 

1700 Citizenship and Identity Verification

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

As part of Public Law 109-171, Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, each U.S. citizen eligible for Medicaid is required to provide proof of U.S. citizenship and identity. This requirement affects all long term services and supports (LTSS) members whose financial eligibility is based on a determination from Medicaid for the Elderly and People with Disabilities (MEPD) specialists.

This documentation must be provided at the initial determination. Verification of citizenship and identity for eligibility purposes is a one-time activity, as documented in the MEPD Handbook, Chapter D-5000, Citizenship and Identity. Once verification of citizenship is established and documented by MEPD specialists, verification is no longer required even after a break in eligibility.

 

1710 Acceptable Documentation for Both Citizenship and Identity

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

 

1711 Supplemental Security Income Recipients

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The State Data Exchange (SDX) contains the needed information to verify citizenship. For any active Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipient, Medicaid for the Elderly and People with Disabilities (MEPD) specialists are able to use the SDX as verification for both citizenship and identity. For any denied SSI recipient, the SDX can be used as a valid verification source of both citizenship and identity when the denial is for any reason other than citizenship. The SDX printout shows action code N13 if the denial is for citizenship.

 

1712 Medicare Recipients

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

Active Medicare recipients are exempt from the requirement to provide evidence of citizenship and identity. The Social Security Administration documents citizenship and identity for Medicare recipients.

For any individual entitled to or enrolled in Medicare Part A or B and subsequently denied Medicare, use the State On-Line Query (SOLQ) system or Wire to Wire Third Party Query (WTPY) system as documentation of both citizenship and identity when the denial is for any reason other than citizenship. If there is an end date listed for Medicare, the individual must provide documentation on the loss of Medicare.

 

1713 All Other Individuals

Revision 18-2; Effective September 3, 2018

 

The primary documents that may be accepted as proof of both identity and citizenship include:

  • U.S. passport;
  • Certificate of Naturalization (N-550 or N-570); or
  • Certificate of U.S. Citizenship (N-560 or N-561).

If an individual does not provide one of these primary documents that establish both U.S. citizenship and identity, the individual must provide two documents:

  • one document that establishes U.S. citizenship; and
  • one document that establishes identity.

See Evidence of Identity below for a list of documents that are acceptable.

Documents that establish citizenship are divided into second, third and fourth levels based on the reliability of the evidence.

Primary Evidence of Citizenship and Identity
  • U.S. passport.
  • Certificate of Naturalization.
  • Certificate of U.S. Citizenship.
  • State Data Exchange (SDX) for denied Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients when the denial reason is for any reason other than citizenship (N13).
  • State On-Line Query (SOLQ)/Wire Third Party Query (WTPY) and documentation on reason for Medicare denial.

 

Begin with the second level of evidence of citizenship and continue through the levels to locate the best available documentation.

Second Level of Evidence of Citizenship
(Use only when primary evidence is not available.)
  • A U.S. public birth certificate showing birth in one of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico (if born on or after Jan. 13, 1941), Guam (on or after April 10, 1899), the U. S. Virgin Islands. (if born on or after Jan. 17, 1917), American Samoa, Swain's Island or the Northern Mariana Islands (if born after Nov. 4, 1986). Contact the Bureau of Vital Statistics (BVS) for an individual born in Texas. If an individual's date of birth (DOB) is earlier than than 1903 or if the birth was out of state, accept a legible, non-questionable copy. For a birth out of state, individuals may obtain a birth certificate through: BirthCertificate.com; vitalchek.com; and usbirthcertificate.net or the toll-free number, 1-888-736-2692.
  • Report of Birth Abroad of a U.S. Citizen (FS-240).
  • Certification of Birth Abroad (FS 545 or DS-1350).
  • U.S. Citizen Identification card (Form I-179 or I-197).
  • Northern Mariana Identification card (I-873).
  • American Indian card (I-872) issued by the Department of Homeland Security with classification code "KIC".
  • Final adoption decree showing the child's name and U.S. place of birth.
  • Evidence of U.S. Civil Service employment before June 1, 1976.
  • U.S. military record showing a U.S. place of birth (Example: DD-214).
Third Level of Evidence of Citizenship
(Use only when primary and second level evidence is not available.)
  • Hospital record of birth showing the U.S. place of birth.
  • Life, health or other insurance record showing the U.S. place of birth.
  • Religious record of birth recorded in the U.S. or its territories within three months of birth that indicates a U.S. place of birth showing either the date of birth or the individual's age at the time the record was made.
  • Early school record showing a U.S. place of birth, name of the child, date of admission to the school, date of birth, and the name(s) and place(s) of birth of the applicant's/recipient's parents.
Fourth Level of Evidence of Citizenship
(Use only when primary, second and third level evidence is not available.)
Any listed documents used must include biographical information, including U.S. place of birth.
  • Federal or state census record showing U.S. citizenship or a U.S. place of birth and the individual's age (generally for individuals born 1900-1950).
  • Seneca Indian Tribal census record showing a U.S. place of birth.
  • Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal census records of the Navajo Indians showing a U.S. place of birth.
  • Bureau of Indian Affairs Roll of Alaska Natives.
  • U.S. state vital statistics official notification of birth registration showing a U.S. place of birth.
  • Statement showing a U.S. place of birth signed by the physician or midwife who was in attendance at the time of birth.
  • Institutional admission papers from a nursing facility (NF), skilled care facility or other institution showing a U.S. place of birth.
  • Medical (clinic, doctor or hospital) record, excluding an immunization record, showing a U.S. place of birth.
  • Affidavits from two adults regardless of blood relationship to the individual. (Use only as a last resort when no other evidence is available.)
Evidence of Identity
  • Driver license issued by a state either with a photograph or other personally identifying information (PII) such as name, age, sex, race, height, weight or eye color.
  • School identification card with a photograph.
  • U.S. military card or draft record.
  • Identification card issued by the federal, state or local government with the same information that is included on a driver license.
  • Department of Public Safety identification card with a photograph or other PII such as name, age, sex, race, height, weight or eye color.
  • Birth certificate.
  • Hospital record of birth.
  • Military dependent's identification card.
  • Native American Tribal document.
  • U.S. Coast Guard Merchant Mariner card.
  • Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood or other U.S. American Indian/Alaskan Native and Tribal document with a photograph or other PII.
  • Data matches with other state or federal government agencies (Example: Employee Retirement System (ERS) and Teacher Retirement System (TRS)).
  • Three or more supporting documents such as a marriage license, divorce decree, high school diploma or employer identification card (use only with second and third level evidence of citizenship).
  • Adoption papers or records.
  • Work identification card with photograph.
  • Signed application for Medicaid (accept signature of a legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR)).
  • Health care admission statement.
  • For children under age 16, school records (may include nursery or day care records).
  • For children under age 16, doctor, clinic or hospital records.
  • For children under age 16, an affidavit signed by a parent or guardian stating the date and place of birth of the child (use as a last resort when no other evidence is available and if an affidavit is not used to establish citizenship).
  • For disabled individuals in residential care facilities who cannot provide any document on this list, an affidavit signed by the facility director or administrator attesting the identity of the individual (use as a last resort when no other evidence is available and if an affidavit is not used to establish citizenship).

 

In the hierarchy of approved documentation sources, some documents listed to verify citizenship are also acceptable to verify identity. When using the hierarchy of approved documentation sources, the same document cannot be the source to verify both citizenship and identity.

If an individual is unable to provide any other documentary evidence of citizenship, an affidavit signed under penalty of perjury is only accepted as a last resort. If the MCO is notified, the MCO staff must notify PSU staff via Form H2067-MC, Managed Care Programs Communication, along with a copy of the affidavit.

 

1800 Member Rights and Responsibilities

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Member rights and responsibilities are included in the Member Handbook. The required critical elements can be found at: https://hhs.texas.gov/services/health/medicaid-chip/provider-information/contracts-manuals/texas-medicaid-chip-uniform-managed-care-manual.

The Member Handbook must be provided to the member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) at application. This document is shared in the language preference expressed by the applicant or member.

In addition, a member or LAR may refer to the Texas Administrative Code, Title 1 Administration, Part 15 Texas Health and Human Services Commission, Chapter 353, Medicaid Managed Care, Subchapter C, Member Bill of Rights and Responsibilities to view the full list of member rights and responsibilities. The Texas Administrative Code is available at: http://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.viewtac.

 

1900 Notifications

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

 

1910 Program Support Unit Notification Requirements

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

Program Support Unit (PSU) staff are responsible for preparing and sending notifications to the applicant, member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) advising of actions taken regarding services and the right to a fair hearing. Form H2065-D, Notification of Managed Care Program Services, is the legal notice sent to an applicant, member, LAR or AR of the actions taken regarding Medically Dependent Children Program (MDCP) services. The form must be completed in plain language that can be understood by the applicant, member, LAR or AR. The language preference of the member must be considered.

The applicant, member, LAR or AR must be notified on Form H2065-D within two business days of the date a case is certified. The form also includes information on the member’s room and board charges and copayment, if applicable.

Form H2065-D is also used to notify an applicant, LAR or AR who is denied or a member, LAR or AR whose services are terminated. PSU staff must notify the applicant, LAR or AR on Form H2065-D of the denial of application within two business days of the decision. See also Section 6000, Denials and Terminations.

Once it is determined that a case action must be taken, Form H2065-D must be prepared and mailed to the member, LAR or AR the same date the form is signed. Notification forms must be posted to the managed care organization's (MCO’s) XXXSKW folder using the correct naming convention in TxMedCentral on the case action date. PSU staff's signature date on Form H2065-D is the case action date.

Depending on when the notification is generated, it will either be posted to the MCO's STAR+PLUS folder in TxMedCentral or generated in the Long Term Care (LTC) Online Portal on the case action date.

 

1920 MCO Notification Requirements

Revision 18-1; Effective March 1, 2018

 

The managed care organization (MCO) is responsible for notifying the member, legally authorized representative (LAR) or authorized representative (AR) when a service is either denied or reduced. This is considered an adverse action and the member, LAR or AR has a right to appeal. Appeal rights of STAR Kids members are in the STAR Kids Managed Care Contract.