Revision 14-1; Effective January 31, 2014

 

 

10100 General Criteria

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

 

10110 Serious Need and Necessary Expense

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

The criteria of serious need and necessary expense are applied to all categories of grant assistance. Serious need for an item or service is present if the item or service is essential for an applicant to reduce or overcome a disaster-related hardship, injury or adverse condition. A necessary expense is the cost of the item or service. Grants are awarded either to fill serious needs or to reimburse applicants for necessary expenses already incurred.

"Serious need" and "necessary expense" are synonymous terms and imply that the grant program is intended to provide funds for essential items and services. It is not intended to fully indemnify disaster losses (that is, restore the recipient fully to pre-disaster condition), or to purchase items or services that may generally be characterized as nonessential, luxury or decorative. In addition, federal regulations require grants to meet needs but prohibit the program from duplicating benefits. Essential items or services paid for by private insurance coverage or by other disaster assistance organizations must not be duplicated by grant funds. The terms "serious need" and "necessary expense" imply that all disaster losses are not covered by the Other Needs Assistance (ONA) provision of Individuals and Households Program (IHP) unless the loss creates a hardship. For example, if damage occurred to three bedrooms of furniture in a single-person household, ONA would pay only one bedroom allowance. Likewise, if an applicant owned two vacuum cleaners and one was damaged and one not, ONA would not pay for the damaged unit. Although a vacuum cleaner may be an essential appliance, the applicant has access to the second undamaged one and therefore, the replacement of the damaged vacuum is not essential.

The maximum grant amount that may be awarded to an individual or family is limited by federal law. The 2002 Disaster Mitigation Act established a maximum grant, to be adjusted annually. Each federal fiscal year the maximum amount is adjusted based on the Consumer Price Index.

 

10120 Eligibility Test

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

The worker applies the following eligibility test guidelines in making a grant determination:

  1. Is the item or service in an eligible category of assistance?
  2. Is the need for the item or service a direct result of the disaster?
  3. Is the item or service essential to the applicant in this particular instance; that is, is there a serious need for the item or service — is it a necessary expense?
  4. Is the applicant unable to meet the need for the item or service from another program or resource?

Example: The applicant claims that his vehicle was damaged by flood.

  1. Is transportation an eligible category of assistance?
  2. Is the need for vehicle repair a direct result of the disaster (and within the incidence period)?
  3. Is vehicle repair essential to the applicant's present situation? (Is there a serious need to repair this vehicle, or does he have a second, undamaged vehicle that would meet his transportation needs?)
  4. Is the applicant unable to meet the need for vehicle repair from another resource? (Has SBA declined a loan? Was there no insurance coverage that would cover essential repair expenses?)

 

10130 Duplication of Benefits

Revision 14-1; Effective January 31, 2014

 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA's) National Processing Service Center (NPSC) operates as a clearinghouse for exchange of information on assistance provided to applicants by disaster aid programs and private insurance. This information is shared with programs to avoid duplicating disaster assistance benefits. Once ONA staff approve or deny a grant, the information is entered by ONA staff in FEMA's National Emergency Management Information System (NEMIS) computer system. This enables FEMA to keep and share a complete record of disaster aid provided to all victims who have registered for assistance.

The ONA provision of IHP prevents duplication of benefits by deducting other assistance for a particular need or expense from the total serious need and necessary expenses amount. However, assistance from other means does not include the value of expendable items. As described in Section 2000, Definitions and Acronyms, expendable items are defined as linens, clothes and basic kitchenware (pots, pans, utensils, dinnerware, flatware, small kitchen appliances).

Assistance from other means includes, but is not limited to:

  • American Red Cross (ARC),
  • Housing Assistance provision of IHP,
  • National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP),
  • Small Business Administration (SBA), and
  • private insurance.

Exception

The ONA provision of IHP may award grants for the applicant's emergency needs if there is an unreasonable delay in receiving assistance from other services. If the applicant is awarded an ONA emergency grant, he must reimburse the department when assistance from another source is received. For example, if the applicant has insurance coverage that should meet his essential needs for repairs but the insurance company is bankrupt or in receivership, the settlement may be delayed for months. In this case, a grant may be provided with the condition that the applicant repay any portion of the grant that is later covered by the insurance settlement. (See Section 10210.2, Insurance Considerations.)

The following chart illustrates possible duplication of benefits by agencies participating in disaster assistance programs.

Duplication of Benefits
ONA Category Other Sources of Assistance
1. Personal Property
  1. Insurance – Contents settlement
  2. SBA – Personal property loan
  3. ARC – May provide clothing, furniture, appliances, work tools and medical equipment. Expendable items such as clothing and basic kitchenware (pots, pans, etc.) are not duplications.
2. Transportation
  1. Insurance – Settlement on vehicle
  2. SBA – Personal property/transportation loan
  3. ARC – May provide funds for vehicle repair
3. Medical/Dental
  1. Insurance
  2. ARC – May pay medical costs
4. Funeral
  1. Insurance
  2. ARC – May provide funds
5. Flood Insurance -
6. Moving and Storage
  1. Insurance
  2. SBA – Personal property loan
7. Child Care
  1. Insurance
  2. FEMA's Public Assistance Program
8. Other  

 

10200 Standard for Other Needs Assistance

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

 

10210 Eligibility Criteria and Guidelines

Revision 05-1; Effective October 1, 2004

 

This section describes the overall eligibility criteria and guidelines HHSC will use to process the Other Needs Assistance (ONA) provision of the Federal Assistance to Individuals and Households Program (IHP) under the Stafford Act 42 U.S.C. 5174(e).

 

10210.1 Housing

Revision 05-1; Effective October 1, 2004

 

Under the provisions of the IHP:

  • Housing Assistance for repair/replacement of owner-occupied primary residences is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Housing Assistance is funded 100 percent by FEMA.
  • HHSC administers the ONA provision of the IHP. Funds for housing repair/replacement are not authorized to be paid by the state.

 

10210.2 Insurance Considerations

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

During registration, the applicant reports any type(s) of insurance coverage. If the applicant has insurance to cover the losses incurred during the disaster, the application will not be referred to Other Needs until the applicant provides the necessary insurance documentation to FEMA that the settlement will be significantly delayed, denied or insufficient to meet his or her needs. (See exception in Item 10130, Duplication of Benefits.)

If an applicant has necessary expenses and serious needs not covered by insurance, they are referred to Other Needs even though they may have insurance for other necessary expenses and serious needs. Some categories also must be considered for the Small Business Administration (SBA) prior to being referred to Other Needs. For example, an applicant's residence is destroyed by a tornado. The applicant has homeowner's insurance, but does not have medical insurance. The application for medical assistance is routed for review, even though the applicant's homeowner's insurance or SBA loan may cover damage to the residence.

Insured applicants must exhaust all means of insurance coverage (for example, flood, homeowner's, medical, dental and funeral) up to the policy maximum or be denied additional compensation from their insurer to be considered for ONA assistance. Insurance coverage (and SBA loans) will limit ONA program grants by reducing the grant amount to avoid duplication of benefits. If there is a single cause of damage, the reduction is not based on a line item list; it is based only on the total FEMA verified loss, less the applicant's insurance award (including deductible). If there are multiple causes of damage (for example, flood and wind-driven rain) then line item payments must be considered to avoid duplication of benefits.

FEMA Verified Loss
– SBA Loan Amount
– Applicant's Insurance Award
– Applicant's Insurance Deductible 
= ONA Grant Award

 

10210.3 SBA Considerations

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

Applicants must first apply for an SBA loan to be considered for ONA grant awards. SBA-approved partial loans will reduce ONA grants awarded to avoid duplication of benefits. FEMA will accept all SBA referrals. Applicants who are declined by SBA but not referred to ONA will not be considered for grant awards.

The categories for which SBA provides assistance, which could be duplicated by ONA, are: personal property, transportation needs resulting from damage to a vehicle, and moving and storage. These categories are known as "SBA dependant" and will not be reviewed by FEMA until SBA has referred them to FEMA.

The categories for which SBA does not provide assistance and are not duplicated by ONA are medical, dental, funeral and miscellaneous expenses. These categories are known as "non SBA dependent" and will be reviewed by FEMA for referral to ONA as soon as possible.

The income test: For SBA dependent categories, whether the applicant is immediately referred to SBA or Other Needs assistance depends on his or her ability to repay a low-interest loan. SBA provides FEMA with income test tables that determine if the applicant's income is sufficient to repay an SBA loan.

The income test is conducted on behalf of SBA for the mutual benefit of FEMA and SBA. If the applicant's income is below the amount SBA considers necessary to support a loan, the application is routed for review. An application whose income level is at or above the amount SBA considers necessary to support a loan is referred to SBA.

Self-employment: Applicants whose primary source of income is from self-employment and who sustain business losses are automatically referred to SBA. However, if an applicant fails the income test he or she will be referred to Other Needs assistance for non-business related expenses or serious needs.

Example: An applicant, when registering for assistance, says that he designs web pages as a contractor in his apartment. He states that he has extensive damage to both his computer equipment and his furniture in his bedroom. This applicant also reports that he needs to move and find another place to live. The applicant will be inspected for real and personal property damage by the inspector for non-business related losses. The inspector will not record his computer as an eligible expense. His income was below the income test; therefore, the application was referred to Other Needs assistance.

SBA may refer an applicant to ONA in one of the following ways:

  • Summary decline: After interviewing the applicant, an SBA representative determines that the applicant will be unable to repay a loan. The applicant receives an SBA "summary decline" and the application is routed to Other Needs assistance.
  • Formal decline: The applicant submits a formal loan application. If the loan is denied, SBA refers the application to Other Needs assistance.
  • Limited (partial) approval: The applicant submits a loan application and is approved for a loan. The amount of the loan is limited by the applicant's ability to repay, and the loan limit is less than the amount of damage verified by SBA. The application is referred to Other Needs assistance.

The NEMIS database is used to track an applicant's status with regard to SBA. When applications are entered into the NEMIS database, referrals to Other Needs assistance through the income test or through summary declines are electronically forwarded. If the applicant must complete an SBA loan application, this is recorded in the database, and the application is not forwarded to Other Needs assistance until SBA formally declines the application or provides a limited loan approval. FEMA will not conduct SBA policy reviews.

Refusal to apply for, or to accept, an SBA loan: If the applicant is referred to SBA through the income test but refuses to submit a loan application to SBA, the applicant is ineligible for assistance from ONA that is SBA dependent. Similarly, if an applicant refuses to accept an SBA loan or to accept the full amount of the loan, he or she is ineligible for SBA dependent ONA.

Late SBA applications: FEMA will accept applications to the IHP for 60 days after the declaration date, or for as long as applications are accepted. In some cases, the formal decline issued by SBA occurs after the application period has expired. If the applicant applied to SBA in a timely manner and was subsequently referred to Other Needs by SBA after the application period, FEMA will accept and process the application. SBA determines if it should accept an untimely loan application based on the circumstances involved. If SBA accepted the loan application, FEMA will subsequently accept and process an application for ONA.

 

10210.4 Processing Applications

Revision 07-1; Effective May 1, 2007

 

After an application has been taken, processing is determined by the needs of the applicant and his status with regard to insurance, SBA and ONA.

SBA status and inspections: An applicant with only personal property and/or transportation damage who has passed the income test will not receive a FEMA inspection. After the applicant is 1) formally denied by SBA, or 2) has received a loan from SBA that is insufficient to meet his necessary expenses and serious needs, an inspection will be conducted.

Once the applicant has received an SBA decline, and appropriate verification has been performed, the application is routed to ONA for processing.

Withdrawal from ONA: An application may be withdrawn from ONA as described below. In all cases, FEMA will notify the applicant by letter.

  • Voluntarily withdraw from all categories: the applicant may withdraw voluntarily from ONA, either in writing or by contacting FEMA or the state.
  • Voluntarily withdraw by category: the applicant determines that he or she does not need assistance for a specific category or type of assistance, but may need assistance in other categories. For example, an applicant determines that he or she does not require assistance with a medical expense, but still requires assistance with personal property needs.
  • Withdraw - no contact: The inspector has been unable to contact the applicant to arrange for an inspection. The applicant will be notified that his application will be withdrawn from consideration unless contact is made within 15 days.

Information Updates: NEMIS must be updated to reflect all actions taken regarding an application. These actions include, but are not limited to:

  • determinations of assistance (awards or denials) and award amounts,
  • payment information,
  • withdrawals,
  • supplemental award amounts,
  • application update information, such as changes of addresses and telephone numbers provided by the applicant,
  • SBA status,
  • recoupments, and
  • returned checks.

Note: When the state administers the ONA provisions of IHP, all mail correspondence will be FEMA's responsibility.

FEMA will retain all documents related to the application review and the eligibility determination for a period of three years after close-out to comply with FEMA manual records management file requirements.

 

10210.5 Verification

Revision 10-1; Effective May 10, 2010

Necessary expenses and serious needs are verified through on-site inspections or by using supporting documentation (for example, estimates, bills, receipts or written statements) submitted by the applicant. It should be noted verification does not require follow up via telephone calls to confirm the expense, unless the authenticity of the document is in question.

Handling of Original Documents

Normal eligibility case processing may require specific additional documents to complete the case. Those documents are to be sent from the applicant (either by mail or fax) directly to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Processing Service Center (NPSC) to be scanned into the applicant’s permanent file. The caseworker may then complete the case by viewing those documents in the FEMA National Emergency Management Information System (NEMIS).

Only the Special Needs Unit and the Hearings Unit may request that applicants send documents directly to the Emergency Services Program office. The following are procedures for the handling of original documents from the applicant:

  1. Special Needs/Hearings caseworker receives original documents (either by mail or fax).
  2. Special Needs/Hearings caseworker then makes sure the applicant’s name and registration ID number are on each page, and faxes the documents to FEMA NPSC, using the Other Needs Assistance (ONA) Coversheet.
    *Note: The Coversheet is used so that an additional ONA work packet is not created in NEMIS.
  3. Special Needs/Hearings caseworker then makes a copy of the original documents and mails the original documents, including the ONA Coversheet, to FEMA NPSC using overnight delivery.
  4. Special Needs/Hearings caseworker checks the applicant’s case periodically to ensure that the original documents were received by NPSC and have been scanned into the applicant’s permanent file in NEMIS.
  5. Once it has been confirmed that the original documents have been received by NPSC and have been scanned into NEMIS, the Special Needs/Hearings caseworker may then shred the copies of the applicant’s original documents.

 

10210.6 General Conditions of Eligibility

Revision 07-1; Effective May 1, 2007

 

To be eligible for ONA an applicant must fulfill all of the following conditions, in addition to any category-specific conditions.

An applicant must:

  • Have no, or insufficient, insurance coverage.
  • File an insurance claim, if applicable, and find that the settlement does not meet his or her other needs, related necessary expenses and serious needs.
  • Have the damages occur in the declared area and be directly associated with the disaster type with approved cause of damage.
  • Apply to all required government disaster programs (for example, SBA) for assistance and be determined unqualified for such assistance, or demonstrate that the assistance received does not satisfy the total necessary expense or serious need.
  • Certify to refund that part of the ONA award for which assistance from other means is received, or which is not spent on disaster-related serious needs and necessary expenses. This is verified when the applicant signs the registration form (FEMA Form 90-69B).
  • Meet the citizenship requirements set forth in 44 CFR. This is verified when the applicant signs the registration form (FEMA 90-69D).

 

10210.7 General Conditions for Denial

Revision 07-1; Effective May 1, 2007

 

An applicant may be denied for all or portions of ONA if any of the following conditions are true:

  • Received assistance from other means (such as insurance or SBA loan) for the specific necessary expense or serious need, or portion thereof, for which the application is made. Expendable items, such as clothing, food and blankets, are not considered a duplication of benefits.
  • Refused assistance from other means (such as SBA or insurance).
  • Has serious needs and necessary expenses met by insurance, SBA, voluntary organizations or other means.
  • Has insurance, for the specific category of assistance, but failed to file a claim.
  • Has unverified or unsubstantiated serious needs or necessary expenses.
  • Has damage solely related to a business, including farm businesses or self-employment (for example, equipment and lot revenues).
  • Requests improvements or additions to personal property to upgrade the size, quality or capacity of personal property owned before the disaster. New items necessary to replace those lost in a disaster are not considered improvements or additions.
  • Requests reimbursement for labor performed by the applicant or members of the applicant's household.
  • Requests reimbursement for financial obligations incurred before the disaster; previously owned debts, back taxes and unpaid utility bills are examples of the items that are considered ineligible pre-disaster financial obligations.
  • Requests assistance for spoiled food supplies.
  • Requests reimbursement for expenses that can be characterized as recreational, non-essential, luxury or decorative.
  • Requests assistance that duplicates assistance provided to other household members.
  • Has received the maximum allowable assistance under the program.
  • The Other Needs Assistance (ONA) Program does not cover the loss or damages to applicant property due to acts of vandalism, unless specifically stated in the State Administrative Plan or Federal-State Agreement. The applicant may want to contact the local law enforcement agency to see if any services are available.

 

10210.8 ONA Specific Guidelines

Revision 07-1; Effective May 1, 2007

 

A necessary expense or serious need is not restricted to an incurred loss. An applicant may have a need that is not a replacement of a lost or damaged item. The examples below illustrate this concept.

  • A disaster destroys the only laundromat in town and the owner has no intention of rebuilding. A family of seven, whose house was also damaged, depended on the laundromat before its destruction. A washer and dryer may be eligible for this family even though they did not own these items before the disaster. The item could be considered under miscellaneous expense assistance.
  • An applicant is injured during a disaster that causes her to be restricted to a hospital bed at home. The hospital bed may be eligible for assistance even though the applicant did not own one before the disaster. This applicant could be considered for medical assistance.
  • An applicant becomes unemployed due to disaster. He obtains a job requiring him to purchase tools and a uniform. Although the applicant did not own these items before the disaster, they could be considered for personal property assistance.

There may be daily, weekly or even monthly recurring costs. ONA will provide assistance for these recurring costs until the serious need or necessary expense is no longer required, or until the maximum award is exhausted, or the performance period ends (the performance period is 18 months after the disaster declaration). ONA will not provide assistance for normal recurring costs the applicant was responsible for before the disaster.

The cost of estimates and service calls is an eligible expense, when the applicant is subsequently determined eligible for the associated item or service.

ONA cannot award a grant amount for less than $50 unless FEMA Disaster Housing has previously made an award under Housing.

Example

The inspector records a single electric fan in an occupied bedroom. The line item cost for the fan is $25. The applicant will receive a check for $25 because they received rental assistance from FEMA, which made the amount over $50.

 

10210.9 Medical and Dental Guidelines

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

Eligible Expenses

All of the following medical and dental expenses that are directly related to the disaster and within the incident period may be awarded assistance.

  • Treatment or services by a licensed physician or dentist related to an injury or condition caused by the disaster.
  • Referral by a licensed physician or dentist.
  • Hospitalization and ambulance services.
  • Replacement or purchase of necessary medication.
  • Replacement, repair or purchase of medical or dental equipment (for example, wheelchair, eyeglasses or bridge work).
  • Long-term or ongoing treatment.
  • Grant award for loss of currently prescribed medications due to disaster is limited to a one-month supply. Verification of purchased prescription is required.
  • Special equipment for vehicles may be included if required for disabled persons.
  • Medical and dental insurance deductibles and co-payments.

Specific Conditions of Eligibility

To receive an ONA award for medical or dental expenses, an applicant must submit a claim for insurance, if applicable, or for Medicaid or Medicare, and provide ONA with information regarding benefits received and or expected. The applicant must provide the medical enclosure statement if he or she does not have health care insurance.

Verification

The following is required to verify the necessary expense or serious need:

  • Actual costs will normally be awarded on the submission of one bill, receipt or estimate.
  • A statement from a licensed physician or dentist that the expenses are necessary and attributed directly to the disaster.
  • In cases of long-term or ongoing treatment, ONA will obtain certification of the need with an estimate of the duration and cost of treatment from a licensed physician or dentist.
  • Prescription replacement requires proof of purchased prescription.
  • Medical equipment replacement requires verification of loss.

Specific Conditions for Denial

An applicant may be denied for all medical or dental grant awards if any of the following conditions are true:

  • Medical and or dental insurance meets the needs of the applicant.
  • Prescription needs met by other assistance (such as Red Cross)
  • Deferred dental maintenance or dentistry upgrades (for example, gold fillings)
  • Mental health conditions (mental health assistance is available from the DSHS MHSA Disaster Crisis Program).
  • Medical and/or dental are not directly related to the disaster.
  • The medical and/or dental occurrence did not occur within the FEMA defined incident period.

 

10210.10 Funeral Guidelines

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

Eligible Expenses

Funeral assistance is financial aid provided to an individual or household that experiences unexpected, uninsured expenses associated with the death of an immediate family member when the death is attributed to an event that is declared a major disaster or emergency. The State Administrative Plan maximum allowance for funerals is $6,500. The types of disaster-related funeral expenses for which assistance may be provided per death are:

  • cost of the casket, burial plot, mortuary services, transportation of the body, interment or cremation, and up to two death certificates;
  • transportation of up to two family members to the disaster area to identify the deceased (transportation of family members to the funeral site is not eligible); and
  • cost of re-interment.

Policy

To be eligible for funeral assistance, an applicant must provide:

  1. Death certificate for the decedent, if available;
  2. Documentation from an authoritative state or local entity, such as the attending physician, medical examiner's office or the coroner's office, attributing the decedent's death or the underlying injury causing the death to the declared emergency or major disaster event; must be directly related to the disaster.
  3. Proof that the applicant is the official "next of kin";
  4. Confirmation that the full amount of funeral expenses have not been paid for by other resources, such as assistance from voluntary agencies or local, state or other government agencies, to avoid duplication of benefit; and
  5. Evidence of an unmet funeral expense.

Eligibility will be based on the cost of a basic funeral/service or direct cremation, as defined by the Federal Trade Commission at 16 CFR 453.2(b)(4)(ii) and 16 CFR 453.2 (4) (4) (iv). The cost of a headstone or urn is not included in this expense.

Examples

  • A tornado hits a rural county in Texas. There was a death reported by the city as well as several news media outlets. The spouse applied to FEMA for assistance and the case is referred to ONA. The state establishes contact with the applicant and requests that the applicant submit a receipt for funeral expenses.
  • A flood occurs in a county in Texas. A month after the incident period an applicant sends in the death certificate of his wife that states the death was disaster-related. The applicant provides a detailed list of funeral and burial expenses that totals $5,000. ONA pays the applicant $5,000. The receipt will be used to determine award eligibility.

Considerations Related to Funerals

The following considerations apply to funerals:

  • Social Security and Veteran's Affairs benefits are considered a duplication of benefits and should be subtracted from funeral assistance.
  • Life and accidental death insurance are not considered duplications of benefits because these are family resources.
  • Funerals will be personally handled by a select ONA group for processing, and treated as a priority. The following process will be used. ONA staff will:
    • establish contact with the relatives of the deceased or family representative to obtain information and provide guidance on how to receive Other Needs Assistance, and
    • maintain contact throughout the process and make telephone calls related to verification if requested by the family or for processing the case to completion.

Specific Conditions of Eligibility

Submit a claim for insurance, if applicable, for burial insurance and provide the state with information regarding benefits received and/or expected.

Verification

  • Physician's certification that the death was disaster-related or copy of death certificate.
  • ONA staff may also contact the American Red Cross (ARC), hospitals, police, fire departments or ambulance companies for verification, or may review newspaper accounts or coroner's reports.
  • Re-interment requires supporting documentation in the form of a letter that states the disinterment.

 

10210.11 Personal Property Guidelines

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

Eligible Expenses

  • The types of disaster-related personal property expenses for which assistance may be awarded are listed in the standardized line item list established by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).
  • FEMA will use the standardized personal property line item list to auto-determine assistance. Upon request from the state, FEMA will add or zero-out items from the standardized list at the time of the National Emergency Management Information System (NEMIS) administrative set-up. In the event a line item is added, the state will provide the associated price to FEMA. The standardized line item costs provided by FEMA's contractor may not be modified by the state.
  • PP Line Items (Clothing): There is one award amount for clothing items deemed necessary for seven days based on the need for one individual. Assistance is not awarded for specific clothing items. The state will apply the same level of award to adults, infants and children regardless of age or gender.

Assistance for clothing will be provided to the applicant and his/her household dependents based on need. Need is determined by the number of people with damaged clothing noted by the inspector. Clothing will not be awarded unless the clothing is destroyed, physically gone (for example, blown away) or contaminated by chemicals, sewer backup, etc. It is expected that clothing that is soaked by wind-driven rain, seepage or flood waters will be cleaned by applicant. Clothing assistance will only be awarded at the replacement line item pricing. Clothing will not be paid per actual incurred expenses or with regard to the season.

Examples

  • During the summer, a tornado damages an applicant's winter clothing as well as summer clothing. The applicant will receive a single award for clothing.
  • During the summer, a flood damages an applicant's winter clothing in the storage shed. The applicant will receive a single award for clothing.
  • There are three people in a household. The dwelling has four bedrooms, all of which are damaged. The clothing in each of the occupied bedrooms is damaged. The unoccupied bedroom contains additional clothing (summer and winter) for each of the household members. The household will be awarded three clothing awards.

PP Line Items (Appliances): Refrigerators, ranges, stroller, twin bed, etc., are eligible under this category.

The inspector will record age-related damaged line items using the following criteria for each dependent of the household:

  • Age 3 and under – a high chair, infant crib, playpen and stroller will be awarded.
  • Age 17 and under – toys will be awarded.

    Note: These are the only age-related line items eligible for consideration.
  • Car seats will not have age criteria, but still require that a dependent be present within the household composition.
  • Assistance for window air-conditioning units, fans and portable heaters will be provided to the applicant based upon need. Need is determined and awarded per common living area and/or occupied bedrooms. Needs are not dependent on the season.
  • Tools and equipment that are required by an employer as a condition of employment. This includes tools or equipment required for a specific trade or profession. Maximum grant award for tools and equipment required for work is $2,400.

    Note: Such items are not eligible if the applicant is self-employed, because tools and equipment would be considered a business expense. Tools used specifically for home or personal vehicle repairs or hobbies are ineligible.
  • Books, equipment and supplies required for education are eligible if the items are required for the applicant's employment or if the applicant is a student or trainee and the items are necessary for courses in which the student or trainee is enrolled, including home schooling, college and trade school courses.
  • Uniforms when required for education or work. Specialized protective clothing (for example, a welder's mask and gloves). Uniforms required for self-employment are ineligible.
  • PP Room Composition Line Items (Rooms): Household items and furnishings, such as beds, towels and sheets, etc., are eligible under this category. The state will use the standardized price list, adding or zeroing out items as necessary, to make awards in this category.
  • Damage to personal property items in storage at the time of the disaster may be eligible if the items are serious needs or necessary expenses as determined by the inspector, or by ONA staff upon receipt of serious need verification from the applicant. Damaged personal property items that were in storage at the time of the disaster for more than 60 days are generally not considered a serious need, as they were not being used at the time of the disaster and their loss does not create a hardship. However, if the applicant can provide evidence that he was going to move to a new location and was planning on moving within a reasonable period of time (accepted a job, signed a lease or bought a home at a new location, etc.), then a grant for the essential stored items may be allowed.

Considerations Related to Personal Property

  • The applicant is not required to provide evidence of ownership of personal property items, except in cases where the applicant is a renter and his or her landlord may own furnishings and appliances.
  • All line items identified by the inspector will be paid without regard to similarity of purpose or function (for example, if an inspector finds both a microwave and a stove damaged, both will be paid).
  • Some damaged items not at an applicant's primary residence may be eligible. The state will make case-by-case reviews of this requirement.
  • Insured applicants must exhaust any content insurance coverage or be denied additional compensation from their insurer to be considered for personal property assistance.
  • Content insurance and reduction of ONA assistance:
    • Applicants must exhaust all means of insurance coverage up to the policy maximum or be denied additional compensation from their insurer to be considered for ONA assistance.
    • Insurance coverage (and partial SBA loans) will limit ONA grant assistance by reducing the grant amount to avoid duplication of benefits. The reduction is not based on a line item list; it is based only on the total FEMA verified loss for personal property, less the applicant’s insurance award (including deductible).
    • If there is a single cause of damage, the ONA award reduction is not based on a line item list; it is based only on the total FEMA verified loss, less the applicant’s insurance award (including deductible).
    • If there are multiple causes of damage (for example, flood and wind-driven rain), then line item payments must be considered to avoid duplication of benefits.

FEMA Verified Loss
– SBA Loan Amount
– Applicant's Insurance Award
– Applicant's Insurance Deductible 
= ONA Grant Award

Examples

  • An applicant is on vacation in Texas. A hurricane hits Corpus Christi and damages all the clothing in the secondary residence. The applicant would receive assistance for clothing.
  • An applicant is on vacation and is camping on the beach. A waterspout destroys the applicant's car with clothes and camping gear inside. The applicant will be eligible for the vehicle damage as well as the eligible personal property.
  • An applicant is moving and is caught in flood while sleeping in a motel near the Nueces River in Nueces County, Texas. The moving truck and all personal property inside the truck are damaged. The applicant did not have any insurance. The applicant may be eligible for the damaged personal property in the rental truck.

In the event the inspector indicates two damaged line items and there is only a need for one item, the lesser of the two will be paid.

Specific Conditions for Eligibility

  • Be determined ineligible for a Small Business Administration (SBA) loan through the income test, be denied an SBA loan or receive an SBA loan that is insufficient to cover Other Needs related to necessary expenses and serious needs.
  • Must be compliant with the National Flood Insurance Reform Act (NFIRA), if the applicant received prior federal assistance that required the purchase of flood insurance.

Verification

  • Assistance will be awarded based upon the recorded line items by the inspector.
  • Personal property assistance for clothing, appliances and room furnishings will usually be based upon on-site verification.
  • The level of damage is recorded by the inspector as X (damaged but repairable or cleanable); Y (some items repairable, other should be replaced); Z (replace all); or NA (not affected).
    • X items will be paid at 25 percent of the line item cost. Y items will be paid at 50 percent of the line item cost. Z items will be paid at 100 percent of the line item cost.
    • For clothing, the state will make a single award amount (Z).
    • For PP room composition, assistance awards are based on the level of damage (X, Y or Z) to specific rooms in the residence.
  • Appliances are rewarded at repair (Y, 50 percent of replacement value) or replace (Z).
  • Personal property assistance for essential tools is based on the indication of need or self-certification as stated by the inspector.
  • Eligibility for stored personal property will usually be verified by the FEMA inspection.

Specific Reasons for Denial

  • Insurance settlement has met the applicant’s need or insurance settlement exceeds the ONA grant award amount that would have been awarded to the applicant.
  • For renters, appliances and furnishings are ineligible when the landlord provides these items. However, the state may make an exception if such an applicant is required to move into a residence due to the disaster where he or she must provide these items.
  • The residence is located in a special flood hazard area (SFHA) in a non-participating or sanctioned community, the current disaster was caused by flooding, and necessary expenses and serious needs are restricted to flood insurable items.
  • The applicant is referred to the SBA and failed to apply, withdrew his or her application, or refused part, or all, of the loan.
  • The applicant was required to purchase and maintain flood insurance as a condition for receiving previous federal disaster assistance and failed to do so, the damage sustained in the current disaster was caused by flooding, and necessary expenses and serious needs are restricted to flood insurable items.
  • The applicant's residence has been listed by FEMA as non-compliant under Section 1316 of the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968.
  • The applicant's residence is located in a Coastal Barrier Resource System (CBRS) area.

 

10210.12 Transportation Guidelines

Revision 11-1; Effective June 27, 2011

Eligible Expenses

Following are types of disaster-related transportation expenses, not to exceed $7,000 per vehicle (value to be adjusted in January each year based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for all consumer goods).

Assistance may be provided for repairs to an automobile, van, truck, boat, motorcycle, bike or other vehicle that are not cosmetic. Cosmetic items are not related to the safe operation of the vehicle (for example, body work, molding, trim, bumpers and paint). Eligible items that are related to health and safety include carpet, seats and headliners. The grant award for transportation repairs is $550 up to $7,000, the maximum replacement amount for a vehicle.

Note: If automatic determination (Auto-D) is switched on, and the FEMA inspector determines that the vehicle is repairable, the applicant will automatically be awarded $550 for minimal repair and towing.

Eligible items for disaster-related transportation expenses include:

  • Cost of repair estimates.
  • Public transportation.
  • Rental car expenses.
  • Replacement of the destroyed vehicle.

Note: When an inspector determines the vehicle is destroyed the state will pay a single lump sum of $7,000 (adjusted annually, based on the CPI), as provided in the State Administrative Plan.

Specific Conditions for Eligibility

  • The damaged vehicle must have been in compliance with all state laws regarding vehicle registration (per the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles guidelines, vehicles must be registered in the new owner's name within 30 days of purchase), inspection, licensing and insurance requirements before the disaster. In general, the applicant has no other usable or working vehicles.
  • Be determined ineligible for a Small Business Administration (SBA) loan through the income test, be denied an SBA loan, or receive an SBA loan that is insufficient to cover his or her Other Needs related to necessary expenses and serious needs.

Examples Related to Vehicle Repair and Replacement: The following examples demonstrate that the lump sum payment method does not consider the value of the vehicle or any outstanding loans on the vehicle. The applicant would receive $550 for repairs based solely on the FEMA inspector's determination that the vehicle was in need of repair. These examples assume the State of Texas Administrative Plan replacement price for serious need vehicles is $7,000.

  • An applicant has no comprehensive insurance, but complies with all other state requirements, including liability requirements, and was initially provided $550 for repairs. Applicant submitted an estimate from a certified mechanic that stated the vehicle in question was a 1974 Pinto. The mechanic stated the value of the vehicle, before the disaster damage, was no more than $50. Further, the mechanic mentioned the vehicle was not repairable. A supplemental award for $6,450 is made to the applicant ($7,000 – $550 = $6,450).
  • An applicant has no comprehensive insurance, but complies with all other state requirements, including liability requirements, and was initially provided $550 for repairs. Applicant submitted an estimate from a certified mechanic that totaled $3,250. The applicant will receive an additional supplement award of $2,700 ($3,250 – $550 = $2,700).
  • An applicant has no comprehensive insurance, but complies with other state requirements and was initially provided $550 for repairs. The applicant submits an estimate from a certified mechanic with repair totals of $8,250. The applicant will receive an additional supplement award of $6,450 ($7,000 – $550 = $6,450).
  • An applicant was initially denied assistance due to insurance; therefore, he or she did not receive the initial repair amount of $550. The applicant has a $10,000 lien on a vehicle deemed "destroyed" by the insurance company and meets the state requirements for eligibility. The insurance settlement of $7,500 was a forced payoff to the lien holder. The applicant has a remaining lien of $2,500 and no transportation. The applicant will receive $7,000.

Examples Related to Vehicle Public Transportation: Public transportation expenses or the increase in transportation expenses.

  • An applicant had a vehicle damaged in the disaster. While the vehicle is being repaired or a new vehicle is being purchased the applicant takes a bus to work each day. The applicant is eligible for the cost of riding the public transportation until the vehicle is repaired or replaced.
  • An applicant rides a bus each day to work. The disaster knocks out a bridge on his/her usual route. The applicant may be reimbursed for the increase in public transportation expenses.

Note: Public transportation is not SBA dependent.

Examples Related to Rental Car Expense: Rental cars will be eligible when an applicant has a temporary need for public transportation assistance, but no public transportation is available.

  • An applicant had a vehicle damaged in the disaster. While the vehicle is being repaired or a new vehicle is being purchased the applicant needs to go to a doctor's appointment. No public transportation is reasonably available. The applicant is eligible for assistance related to renting a car. Eligible expenses are limited to the cost of renting a compact-size vehicle. The applicant will not be eligible for daily gas expenses because the purchase of gas was a normal recurring cost before the disaster.
  • An applicant rides a bus each day to work. The disaster knocks out a bridge on his/her usual route. Public transportation is no longer provided in either his/her area or the area of his/her employment. The applicant is eligible for assistance related to renting a car until public transportation service is restored. The applicant will be eligible for daily gas expenses because the purchase of gas was not a normal recurring cost before the disaster.

Considerations Related to Transportation

A family may demonstrate the need for repairs to, or replacement of, more than one vehicle. The family will need to demonstrate that the additional vehicle is integral in the daily maintenance of the household (that is, work, school, regularly scheduled long-term medical appointments, etc.)

Examples

  • A husband works and the wife takes their children to school each day. The school district does not provide reasonable, convenient transportation to and from their primary residence. The husband's place of employment is not reasonably served by public transportation. The family has two vehicles without comprehensive insurance that the inspector indicates were destroyed by the disaster. The family has no other vehicles. One of the vehicles is auto-determined as eligible. The family is eligible for an award for more than one vehicle.
  • A wife works and drives each day. The husband stays at home and takes care of the children (ages 1, 4, 7 and 16 years). The family has two vehicles without comprehensive insurance that the inspector indicates were destroyed by the disaster. The family has no other vehicles. One of the vehicles is auto-determined as eligible. The family submits a statement that the husband uses the second vehicle to run errands such as getting groceries. The applicant would receive assistance for the additional vehicle.
  • A family may not have owned a vehicle before the disaster, but now demonstrates an ongoing and permanent need for transportation. Additionally, the applicant needs to demonstrate the absence of public transportation or the inability of public transportation to meet the disaster-related need.
  • An applicant took public transportation to work before the disaster. Due to the disaster, his place of employment has been forced to relocate to an area that is not served by public transportation. The lump sum replacement amount for a vehicle will be eligible.
  • Additional transportation costs due to damage to a community's infrastructure may be eligible.
  • A flood destroys the only bridge in a community. An applicant who drives to work each day and whose place of employment is on the opposite side of the river is forced to pay for ferry service across the river. The bridge was knocked out due to the disaster. The applicant is eligible for the cost of the ferry.
  • Transportation expenses for migrant workers whose employment has been affected by the disaster will be eligible.
  • Funds received from salvage of a vehicle are considered duplicative and are deducted from the assistance award for the vehicle.
  • If a bank or other lender exercises its right to take the proceeds from an applicant's vehicle insurance policy, the state will award assistance for the applicant's unmet transportation needs.

Verification

  • Vehicle repair or replacement assistance will usually be based using on-site inspection verification.
  • Verification of vehicle registration, liability insurance and compliance with state law will usually be accomplished during the on-site inspection.
  • Actual repair costs will usually be awarded on the submission of bills, receipts or estimates on the repair company's letterhead.
  • For multiple vehicle awards, the applicant must provide a statement on why more than one vehicle is a serious need.
  • For an award to provide a vehicle that was not previously owned, the applicant must provide a statement that public transportation is not available for the indefinite future.
  • For an award to receive public transportation, an applicant must provide a statement that explains why there is an increase in his or her public transportation costs.
  • For an award to receive rental car expenses, an applicant must provide a statement that public transportation is not available.
  • For an award to a migrant worker, the applicant must indicate his intention to relocate to the next seasonal place of employment or to return home. The state will verify the effect of the disaster on the applicant's employment. The state will determine the appropriate award amount based on available common carrier or private vehicle mileage reimbursement.

Specific Reasons for Denial

  • The applicant did not comply with vehicle registration, inspection, licensing or liability insurance requirements before the disaster or failed to provide the vehicle registration at the time of the disaster.
  • The damage to the vehicle was cosmetic only.
  • The applicant is referred to SBA and failed to apply, withdrew his/her application or refused part or the entire loan.
  • The applicant has a usable vehicle that meets his or her needs for transportation.
  • The applicant has comprehensive insurance that meets his essential needs.
  • The applicant lives in a Coastal Barrier Resource System area.

 

10210.13 Moving and Storage Guidelines

Revision 09-1; Effective July 20, 2009

 

Eligible Expenses

ONA may provide assistance for disaster-related moving and storage of personal property to avoid additional personal property damages. Applicants must have personal property damages to be eligible for moving and storage. The only exception is if the applicant's property has been determined to be unsafe by local officials due to the disaster and residents are forced to relocate by the local officials. The maximum allowance for moving and storage is $4,000.

  • Moving costs for personal property to storage (for example, cost of truck, tape, boxes).
  • Cost of storage.
  • Return of personal property.

Specific Conditions for Eligibility

  • Be determined ineligible for an SBA loan through the income test, be denied an SBA loan or receive an SBA loan that is insufficient to cover his or her other needs related to necessary expenses and serious needs.
  • Damage to primary residence.
  • The state may not award assistance for the moving and storage of ineligible items (such as recreational equipment).
  • The state may provide moving and storage for up to the period of assistance (18 months after the disaster declaration).

Verification

  • Actual costs will usually be awarded on the submission of the bills and receipts.
  • Damage to a primary residence will be verified through either on-site inspection or an insurance settlement.

Specific Reasons for Denial

  • The applicant is referred to SBA and failed to apply, withdrew his/her application, refused part or the entire loan or received a full loan.
  • No damage or insufficient damage to primary residence.
  • Moving and storage costs associated with relocating from a damaged primary residence to a new primary residence out of state.
  • The applicant has moved into a new primary residence; moving and storage assistance is denied from the date of occupancy forward.

    Examples
    • An applicant, after a disaster, moved his/her personal property to a storage facility. The insurance settlement paid for all the real and personal property damages but not moving and storage. The applicant submitted a $500 receipt. The applicant was paid $500.
    • An applicant, after a disaster, moved personal property from his/her damaged residence to a new residence. The applicant provided a bill for $800. The applicant was paid $800.
    • An applicant moved personal property before the event as a preventative measure. The inspector recorded no real and personal property damages or that the damage was "insufficient" for the disaster event. The applicant submitted a bill for $250. Applicant was denied assistance.
    • An applicant's personal property is in storage before the disaster. The cost of the moving and storage will be denied as not disaster related.

 

10210.14 Child Care Guidelines

Revision 14-1; Effective January 31, 2014

 

Eligible Expenses

The state may provide assistance for disaster-related child care expenses under a provision of the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013. These expenses include the fee for service of providing child care, registration fees and health screenings. The maximum amount of assistance is up to eight weeks of child care, or the maximum allowed amount for child care, whichever is less. Child care is considered a non-SBA dependent category.

Specific Conditions of Eligibility

  • The child for which child care is being requested must be a taxable dependent of the parent or guardian requesting the child care assistance.
  • Applicant has an increased financial burden either by change in gross income or increase in child care cost as a result of the disaster.
  • Applicant does not have another resource available for child care, such as compensation from insurance or another source that meets the applicant’s child care needs.
  • The child is age 13 and under or age 14 to 18 who has functional needs.
  • The child care provider is licensed, regulated or registered under state law.

Verification

  • Applicant must have a child listed as a dependent and occupant of the applicant’s dwelling at the time of the disaster.
  • Evaluation of applicants’ pre-and post-disaster gross income as well as pre-disaster child care expenses.
  • Applicants requesting child care for children age 14 to 18 will need to provide proof that the children need assistance caring for themselves (that is, proof of functional need).

Specific Reasons for Denial

  • The applicant did not demonstrate through submitted documentation an increased financial burden for child care as a result of the disaster.
  • The applicant applied to be reimbursed for ineligible fees, such as:
    • fees for any extracurricular activities, additional services (for example, school photographs) or off‐site trips (for example, field trips) that are not a standard, reoccurring fee in the contract or agreement between the child care provider and responsible party;
    • optional fees that do not interfere with the day‐to‐day child care services that are provided to the eligible child (for example, prepared lunches, snacks, facility provided linens, etc.);
    • fees for transportation;
    • educational services (for example, after-school tutoring);
    • medical care or services; or
    • recreational camps or clubs (for example, after-school clubs, overnight camps, etc.).
  • The applicant did not apply within the period of eligibility.
  • The child care provider is not an “eligible child care provider.” To be an eligible child care provider, the provider must be licensed, regulated or registered under applicable state or local law.
  • Applicant has another resource available for child care, such as compensation from insurance or another source that meets the applicant’s child care needs.

 

10210.15 Miscellaneous Expenses Guidelines

Revision 14-1; Effective January 31, 2014

 

Eligible Expenses

The types of disaster-related miscellaneous expenses (tangible items) purchased by the applicant at the time of the disaster for which assistance may be awarded are:

  • humidifier,
  • dehumidifier,
  • chainsaw, and
  • generator (medical necessity).

Note: Additional items may be determined eligible under this category and will be reviewed at the time of a disaster on a case-by-case basis.

Note: The assistance is awarded on the line item costs established by FEMA's pricing contractor. When the expense is not established through the contracting agent, the state will pay the actual cost. The state reserves the right to establish a maximum allowable amount for that item.

The generator is purchased or rented because of an event that results in an emergency or major disaster declaration by the president. For the purposes of this policy, the qualifying incident period for the event starts at the date the governor declared a state of emergency and ends at the closure of the incident date published by FEMA in the Federal Register, or the date power is restored to the applicant's dwelling, whichever occurs first.

The applicant's dwelling is located in a declared area designated for IA.

The generator is purchased or rented to power a medically required appliance.

The applicant provides proof-of-purchase or rental receipts for the generator.

The applicant provides proof that the appliance is required for medical purposes (for example, letter from physician that the applicant/occupant has a medical need for the appliance). Generators purchased or rented for the sole purpose of keeping medications cool are not eligible for ONA award assistance.

If the preceding criteria are verified, the cost of the generator will be reimbursed at the prevailing retail or rental rate identified by FEMA for a 5.5 kw-size generator.

Reimbursement of rental cost is limited to the period that the generator was rented until commercial power was restored to the dwelling.

Reimbursement of rental cost will not exceed established retail purchase pricing guidelines for a 5.5 kw generator.

The grant coordinating officer (GCO) may request FEMA to waive one or more eligibility criteria during extraordinary circumstances (for example, sustained power outage during a period of subfreezing temperatures or extreme heat), when determined to be in the public interest.

Consideration for Miscellaneous Expenses

The item may be purchased, rented or leased.

Verification

  • Miscellaneous expense assistance will usually be verified during the on-site inspection.
  • In the event the item was not recorded during the inspection, the bill or receipt for the purchase, rental or lease of the item must be submitted to the state along with a statement from the applicant that explains why the miscellaneous expense is disaster-related and must be submitted.
  • A letter from physician stating that a generator is medically required.

Specific Reasons for Denial

Expenses incurred for generators purchased or rented outside the established time frame are not eligible for reimbursement. Generators that are not needed for medical necessity are not eligible. Generators purchased or rented for the sole purpose of keeping medications cool are not eligible.

 

10210.16 Critical Needs Assistance (CNA)

Revision 14-1; Effective January 31, 2014

 

The request for CNA must be made in writing by the state with concurrence from the regional administrator or federal coordinating officer to the assistant administrator for disaster assistance. The request for CNA implementation must be received at the time of setup for a disaster declaration of individual assistance. This assistance is to be used for the purpose of meeting critical out-of-pocket expenses as a result of the disaster.

Eligible Expenses

A fixed $500 award will be provided automatically for applicants to use for their immediate disaster-related needs (diapers, formula, food, etc.). One eligible payment per household (separated household policy does not apply to ONA categories) will be allowed under the Miscellaneous/Other category of ONA assistance, which is not SBA or insurance dependent.

Specific Conditions for Eligibility

  • Applicant:
    • has registered for FEMA individual assistance;
    • has disaster-related damages to their primary residence, rendering the home uninhabitable (habitability repairs required – yes);
    • has been determined eligible for Individuals and Households Program (IHP) assistance (IDV passed, occupancy passed, 90-69, etc.);
    • must have answered Yes to the essential needs question: Do you have a disaster-related emergency need for food, medication or gas?; and
    • has $500 in available assistance remaining within the maximum grant allowance.
  • No other person in the household has been paid a CNA payment.
  • CNA is not insurance or SBA dependent.

 

10210.17 Group Flood Insurance Policy

Revision 14-1; Effective January 31, 2014

 

Eligible Expenses

The state may provide assistance for purchasing a Group Flood Insurance Policy (GFIP). The financial assistance will be provided on behalf of the applicant to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Specific Conditions for Eligibility

  • The applicant receives financial assistance for personal property damage due to flood under the ONA provision of IHP.
  • The applicant has a FEMA-imposed National Flood Insurance Reform Act of 1994 (NFIRA) requirement.
  • The applicant lacks SBA loan repayment ability and is referred to ONA.
  • Must reside in a 100-year Flood Zone A or Z.

    Examples
    • An applicant has $4,000 of real property damage and $3,000 of personal property damage due to flood. The applicant fails the SBA income test. The applicant will receive $7,000 of real and personal property damage and an IHP-imposed NFIRA requirement. The applicant is eligible for GFIP financial assistance that will be provided for and sent to the NFIP by the ONA supervisor/grant coordinating officer (GCO) on behalf of the applicant.
    • An applicant has $4,000 of real property damage and $3,000 of personal property damage due to flood. The applicant passes the income test. The applicant receives $4,000 of real property assistance and an IHP-imposed NFIRA requirement. After applying to SBA, the applicant is provided a full loan to cover all additional disaster-related needs. The applicant is not eligible for the personal property assistance or the GFIP financial assistance.
    • An applicant has $4,000 of real property damage and $3,000 of personal property damage due to flood. The applicant passes the income test. The applicant receives $4,000 of real property assistance and an IHP-imposed NFIRA requirement. After applying to SBA, the applicant is denied assistance and is referred to IHP for additional Other Needs Assistance. The applicant is eligible for $3,000 of personal property assistance as well as GFIP financial assistance that will be paid for and sent to the NFIP by the ONA GCO on behalf of the applicant.
    • An applicant has $8,000 of real property damage and $3,000 of personal property damage due to flood. The applicant fails the income test. The applicant receives $5,000 of real property assistance (maximum for repairs) from FEMA and $3,000 of personal property assistance from ONA, as well as an IHP-imposed NFIRA requirement. The applicant is therefore eligible for GFIP financial assistance that will be paid for and sent to the NFIP by the ONA GCO on behalf of the applicant.
    • An applicant has $8,000 of real property damage only, due to flood. The applicant fails the income test. The applicant receives $5,000 of real property assistance as well as an IHP-imposed NFIRA requirement. The applicant is not eligible for a GFIP because there is no eligible personal property loss.
    • An applicant has $8,000 of real property damage only, due to flood. The applicant passes the income test. The applicant receives $5,000 of real property assistance as well as an IHP-imposed NFIRA requirement. After applying to the SBA, the applicant is denied assistance. However, there will not be a referral to ONA. The applicant is not eligible for GFIP financial assistance because ONA did not provide a grant for personal property (no personal property damage).

Specific Reasons for Denial

  • Applicants that received a limited or partial loan from the SBA will not receive a GFIP.
  • Applicants that received replacement housing will not receive a GFIP, unless they lack SBA loan repayment ability and are referred to ONA with personal property damage.

Considerations for Group Insurance Premiums

  • GFIP coverage will be equal to the maximum amount of the IHP award each year.
    Note: That award amount is adjusted annually (in October each year) in line with the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers.
  • The GFIP policy coverage will start 60 days after the declaration date and run for 36 months thereafter.

Verification

Payment of the GFIP will usually be based upon the personal property payment of ONA with a FEMA flood insurance requirement within NEMIS.

 

10210.18 Unspecified Types of Assistance and Items

Revision 14-1; Effective January 31, 2014

 

The state may determine that other specific services needed for recovery expenses are eligible on a case-by-case basis. This category is reserved for services and items that are currently unspecified, but are necessary expenses and serious needs that are unique to a specific disaster. The final decision on these items will be made by the GCO and SCO.

 

10210.19 Notification

Revision 14-1; Effective January 31, 2014

 

Applicants are entitled to prompt notification of assistance decisions by letter. The state will use letters in NEMIS to notify applicants of their eligibility. The letters will be mailed to the applicant by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Processing Service Center (NPSC), as FEMA handles all correspondence under the "Joint" administration of ONA. The state will create its own letters addressing recoupments and appeals considerations. A copy of all state-generated letters will be provided to the application case file in NEMIS.

Types of notification letters:

  • Approval
  • Denial
  • Withdrawal
  • Requests for information
  • Recoupments
  • Appeals
  • Miscellaneous (referrals, etc.)
  • Flood insurance requirement, specifically, when flood insurance purchase and maintenance is a condition of the assistance award, a letter will notify the applicant of the requirement

Line Item Specific Guidelines

A damaged helmet will be determined eligible when the inspector determines that a mode of transportation that requires a helmet exists in the household.

Examples

  • An applicant has a dirt bike that is used for fun on weekends. The applicant has a damaged helmet. The applicant will not be paid for the replacement of the helmet.
  • An applicant uses a motorcycle to drive to work and back each day. The disaster damaged the helmet. The applicant will receive assistance for the damaged helmet.
  • An applicant has a helmet that was damaged in the disaster. The applicant does not own a vehicle of any sort for which a helmet is required. The applicant will not receive assistance for the helmet.