Minimum TAC Requirements for Written Disaster Plans

Scope

The licensing rules give minimum requirements for the written disaster plan that each type of facility or agency must have. These requirements include the following:

Nursing Homes TAC 19.1914 (c)

The written disaster plan must address, at a minimum, eight core functions:

  1. Direction and control;
  2. Warning;
  3. Communication;
  4. Sheltering arrangements;
  5. Evacuation;
  6. Transportation;
  7. Health and medical needs; and
  8. Resource management.

Type A and Type B ALFs (TAC §92.62 (d))

The written disaster plan must address, at a minimum, eight core functions:

  1. Direction and control;
  2. Warning;
  3. Communication;
  4. Sheltering arrangements;
  5. Evacuation;
  6. Transportation;
  7. Health and medical needs; and
  8. Resource management.

ICF/IID Facilities (TAC §90.74 (a))

The written disaster plan must address:

  1. Emergency evacuation transportation;
  2. Adequate sheltering arrangements;
  3. Supplies;
  4. Staffing;
  5. Emergency equipment;
  6. Identification of residents (and, for adult day care facilities, transfer of records);
  7. Responding to family inquiries; and
  8. Post-disaster activities (including emergency power, food, water, and transportation).

Adult Day Care Facilities (TAC §98.42 (a))

  1. Emergency evacuation transportation;
  2. Adequate sheltering arrangements;
  3. Supplies;
  4. Staffing;
  5. Emergency equipment;
  6. Identification of residents (and, for adult day care facilities, transfer of records);
  7. Responding to family inquiries; and
  8. Post-disaster activities (including emergency power, food, water, and transportation).

§Home and Community Support Services Agencies (HCSSAs) (TAC §97.256)

An agency's emergency preparedness and response plan must:

  1. Designate, by title, an employee, and at least one alternate employee to act as the agency's disaster coordinator;
  2. Include a continuity of operations business plans;
  3. Include how the agency will monitor disaster-related news and information;
  4. Include procedures to release client information in the event of a disaster; and
  5. Describe the actions and responsibilities of agency staff in each phase of emergency planning, including mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.
  6. The response and recovery phases of the plan must describe:
    1. The actions and responsibilities of agency staff when warning of an emergency is not provided;
    2. Who at the agency will initiate each phase;
    3. A primary mode of communication and alternated or alert systems in the event of telephone or power failure; and
    4. Procedures for communicating with staff, clients, local and state emergency management agencies; and other entities including DADS and other healthcare providers.
  7. An agency's emergency preparedness and response plan must include procedures to triage clients.
  8. An agency's emergency preparedness and response plan must include procedures to identify a client who may need evacuation assistance from local and state jurisdictions.
  9. If the agency identifies a client who may need evacuation assistance, agency personnel must provide the client with the amount of assistance the client requests to complete the registration process for evacuation assistance if the client:
    1. Wants to register with the 211 system; and
    2. Is not already registered.
  10. An agency must orient and train employees, volunteers, and contractors about their responsibilities in the agency's emergency preparedness and response plan.
  11. An agency must complete an internal review of the plan at least annually, and after each actual emergency response, to evaluate its effectiveness and to update the plan as needed.
  12. As part of the annual internal review, an agency must test the response phase of its emergency preparedness and response plan in a planned drill if not tested during an actual emergency response. Except for a freestanding hospice inpatient unit, a planned drill can be limited to the agency's procedures for communicating with staff.

Hospice agencies with Its own inpatient unit Must also comply with (TAC 97.403 (w)(2) in Addition to (97.256))

A freestanding hospice facility must also address the following core functions of emergency management in its written emergency preparedness plan:§

  1. Direction and control(the person in charge with the ability to analyze information, make decisions, and direct and coordinate staffing requirements)
  2. Communication (with whom and by what mechanism). A hospice provider may use the web-based system designed to help DADS-regulated facilities relocate and track clients during disasters that require mass evacuations. Please refer to PL 08-22, Facility Inventory, Vacancy and Evacuation Status (FIVES), for additional information.
  3. Resource management(supplies, transportation, staff, equipment, medications, food, water, emergency power, potable water, extra medical supplies)
  4. Sheltering in place(building structure, communication with emergency agencies, staffing, maintaining continuity of care)
  5. Evacuation(prearranged destinations, routes, client records, staff, counseling services, decision for safe return)
  6. Transportation (type, backup plan, coordination)
  7. Training(notification, staff responsibility, drills, and clients' participation).

Provider Letter (PL) 11-25 - Emergency Preparedness Planning for an External or Internal Disaster (Replaces PL 06-18)