Assistive Technology Trainer Guidelines and Procedures

Chapter 1: Introduction to Assistive Technology Training

1.1 Purpose and Location

Training is provided to prepare a DBS consumer to effectively use assistive technology in employment or in educational settings after high school. Assistive technology training is provided either on-site at the consumer's home or workplace or at a facility.

1.2 Overview of the DBS Curriculum

You, the assistive technology trainer, must use the DBS-established curriculum. The training is divided into self-contained, sequential units known as "modules," which have estimated times for completion.

Most modules take between eight and twelve hours to complete, depending on the abilities of the consumer and you. Each module has been designed to stand alone so that you and the counselor may target the modules that are most relevant.

1.3 Baseline Assessment

Before requesting specific assistive technology training, the employment assistance specialist (EAS) sometimes conducts a baseline assessment of the consumer's skills and knowledge. Conduct a baseline assessment using the guidelines contained in this manual to design an appropriate and effective schedule before training begins.

1.4 Post-Training Assessment

After authorized training has been completed, you must complete a post-training assessment to determine training effectiveness.

1.5 If More Training Hours Are Needed

The estimated completion time is noted at the beginning of each module. For more training hours, send a justification to the consumer’s counselor if

  • additional time is required to complete a module,
  • additional training is required, or
  • the consumer cannot satisfactorily complete the post-training assessment.

The counselor can authorize up to 10 additional training hours per module. The field director can authorize an additional 10 hours per module. Any additional hours must be approved by the director of field services.

1.6 Problems with Equipment

If you have problems with equipment or software at the training site, contact the counselor or EAS immediately.

1.7 Questions about Training or Contracts

Training

For questions about training, contact the Assistive Technology Unit at atu@dars.state.tx.us or (512) 377-0310.

Contracts

For questions about contracts, contact cst_hhsc@hhsc.state.tx.us.

Chapter 2: Baseline Assessment

2.1 Determining Consumer Training Needs

A baseline assessment is used to determine the consumer's skill level and training needs. You, the assistive technology trainer, should conduct a baseline assessment before training begins unless the counselor, EAS, or designee has already completed one. A baseline assessment may have been completed by the consumer's counselor, EAS, or designee.

2.2 Baseline Assessment

Answer the following questions during the baseline assessment.

  1. What is the consumer’s primary purpose for learning about computers and computing?
  2. What is the consumer’s level of computer literacy?
    • What software is the consumer familiar with?
    • What does the consumer know about hardware?

    Note: To determine a consumer’s competency level, ask the consumer to perform certain tasks. Record the tasks and how well the consumer performed each one (for example, the consumer performed the task without difficulty, the consumer performed the task with difficulty, or the consumer could not perform the task).

  3. What does the consumer know about input devices?
    • Is the consumer familiar with the QWERTY keyboard?
    • Is the consumer familiar with the layout of the numeric keypad?
    • What does the consumer know about extended keys such as backslash, function keys, etc.?
    • Is the consumer proficient using the mouse?
  4. Which functions does the consumer feel are essential to complete required tasks?
  5. What are the three most important objectives the consumer wishes to accomplish? For example,
    • to learn computer screen access,
    • to become proficient at word processing,
    • to use PowerPoint, Excel, or some other business application (Record the specific applications), or
    • to efficiently use the operating system and necessary applications.
  6. On a scale of one to five (five being expert), what does the consumer consider to be his or her level of competency in each of those three areas of interest?
  7. How fast can the consumer type?

Note: The consumer must be able to type at least 30 words per minute to receive assistive technology

2.3 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during the baseline assessment.

  1. The consumer can identify and define computer hardware such as monitor, CPU, disk drives, and removable media—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer understands software types such as word processors, screen readers, screen magnifiers, and adaptive software—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can identify the important elements of the extended keyboard such as the numeric key pad, the six-pack keypad, Ctrl keys, Alt keys, and Windows logo key—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer understands the concept of multi-key commands such as Shift, Ctrl, and F6Yes or No.
  5. The consumer’s typing speed—words per minute.

Chapter 3: Keyboard Skills Training

3.1 Minimum Typing Speed Requirement

All consumers who are not employed must be able to type 30 words per minute (wpm) unless prevented by

  • a physical impairment, or
  • a documented secondary disability that significantly limits manual dexterity.

Employed consumers may be exempted from the typing speed requirement if their employment does not require a minimum typing speed. Other exemptions are made on a case-by-case basis during the baseline assessment.

If a consumer who is referred for training cannot type 30 wpm, you, the trainer, should notify the counselor or EAS immediately. Consumers who cannot satisfy the typing speed requirement should begin their training schedule with the keyboard skills training described below. Basic keyboarding and typing should be taught at a training facility or community college rather than in the consumer’s home. Training facilities offer reduced rates for practice sessions.

3.2 Keyboard Skills Training

Keyboard skills are defined as the ability to touch-type using a QWERTY keyboard, including the function keys.

The time required to complete the keyboard skills module depends on the consumer’s level of manual dexterity and familiarity with the keyboard. The estimated time to achieve 30 wpm is from 24 to 32 hours of training, along with regular practice at home.

3.3 The QWERTY Keyboard (15 Hours)

Teach QWERTY keyboard skills using the following steps.

  1. Test consumers to determine their speed and accuracy on the keyboard.
  2. Provide instruction and exercises to develop consumers’ speed and accuracy on the QWERTY keyboard including
    • teaching general layout of the keyboard by touch;
    • using a blindfold, if appropriate, to develop touch-typing techniques;
    • teaching the home row position; and
    • teaching how to locate and use the Shift keys, Tab, forward and back slashes, Return, and Backspace.

3.4 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during keyboard skills training.

  1. The consumer can type 10 to 15 words per minute with accuracy—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can set tabs, use capitals correctly, find the slash keys, and Backspace to make corrections—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer understands the function of the Return or Enter key—Yes or No.

3.5 The Extended Keyboard (12 Hours)

Teach extended keyboard skills using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (The QWERTY Keyboard).
  2. For screen-reader users, provide instruction and practice on the numeric keypad function of the Num-Lock key.
  3. Provide practice in locating and using the function keys, arrow keys, and the six-pack keypad next to the numeric keypad.
  4. Provide instruction in locating and using the Alt keys, Ctrl keys, and Windows logo key.
  5. Provide drills and exercises in using multikey commands such as Ctrl+Alt+Delete, etc.

3.6 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during extended keyboard training.

  1. The consumer can locate and use the arrow keys, Page Up and Page Down keys, Home and End keys, and plus and minus keys on the numeric key pad—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can delete, move from the top to the end of the file, and use the six-pack keypad next to the numeric keypad—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can use multikey commands such as Shift, Ctrl, and F6 to accomplish various tasks—Yes or No.
  4. Unless exempted, the consumer can type 30 words per minute with accuracy—words per minute.

Chapter 4: Setting Up the Work Station

4.1 Setting Up the Workstation (4 to 6 Hours)

Teach setting up the workstation using the following steps.

  1. Determine the most effective way for the consumer to take notes.
  2. Provide instruction on the CPU including
    • turning on the computer and shutting it down,
    • performing a cold reboot,
    • connecting peripherals to the computer,
    • testing a scanner, and
    • printing a test page.
  3. If applicable, provide instruction on PC-access and laptop (USB) video magnifier/OCR devices including
    • installing device software;
    • testing device features (connectivity, panning, zoom, contrast, distance viewing, etc.);
    • setting the focus and contrast on a video magnifier;
    • changing device settings; and
    • using line markers.
  4. Provide instruction on organizing the workstation including
    • the importance of good lighting,
    • the most efficient arrangement of peripherals, and
    • labeling important keys on a computer keyboard.
  5. Provide instruction on organizing tech support phone numbers for relevant software and hardware and how to use them.

4.2 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during workstation set-up training.

  1. The consumer can turn the computer on, shut the computer down correctly, and connect all peripherals to the CPU—Yes or No.
  2. If applicable, the consumer can use the split-screen feature and adjust the video magnifier effectively—Yes, No, or NA (not applicable).
  3. The consumer can identify a problem, contact tech support, and provide a clear, concise description of the problem—Yes or No.

Note: If the consumer needs additional training on how to set up the workstation or video magnifier, contact the EAS or counselor before providing training beyond the authorized time.

Chapter 5: Operating System Features and Functions

5.1 Understanding the Structure of the Operating System (10 to 15 Hours)

Teach operating system structure using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Setting Up the Workstation).
  2. Explore the operating system software environment.
  3. Provide instruction on navigating the desktop, start menu, system tray, side bar (enabling and disabling), notification area, and task bar.
  4. Provide instruction on system dialog boxes and controls including
    • using multitabbed dialog boxes;
    • identifying and moving between dialog box controls;
    • using combo boxes, checklists, edit boxes, and radio buttons; and
    • using a screen reader to read the entire dialog box, if applicable.
  5. Explore documents, files, folders, directories, and paths including
    • reading through tree views and list views;
    • locating removable storage, local disk drives, and CD-ROM drive; and
    • safely removing devices.
  6. Provide instructions on program windows and their structure including
    • knowing the difference between program windows and dialog boxes;
    • using status and scroll bars;
    • minimizing, maximizing, moving, and restoring windows;
    • switching between applications; and
    • accessing the components of a program window using the keyboard.
  7. Provide instruction on keyboard commands for operating system functions.
  8. Provide instruction on getting help online and in the operating system.

5.2 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during operating system structure training.

  1. The consumer can easily move between the desktop, start menu, and running applications—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can minimize and maximize applications, and open and close windows—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can use operating-system keyboard commands to access and exit the menu bar and tool bars—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can open default folders and locate documents, libraries, etc.—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can locate and explore computer contents as well as files saved on external storage devices, CDs, and flash drives—Yes or No.
  6. The consumer can navigate through tree views, list boxes, check boxes, dialog boxes, and combo boxes—Yes or No.

5.3 Operating System Options, Features, and Maintenance (10 to 12 Hours)

Teach operating system options, features, and maintenance using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Understanding the Structure of the Operating System).
  2. Explore the control panel, including
    • viewing the device manager,
    • establishing a wireless network connection, and
    • establishing a LAN broadband connection (automatically detect settings).
  3. Provide instruction on using system tools including
    • Disk Cleanup,
    • Disk Defragmenter, and
    • System Restore, which is used to undo system changes.
  4. Provide instruction on working with files including
    • creating a new folder;
    • moving files into a new folder using cut and paste;
    • deleting unwanted files and folders; and
    • copying files from removable storage to a folder on the local disk (C: drive), and vice versa.
  5. Provide instruction on burning a CD.
  6. Provide instruction on setting up the firewall and setting security options.
  7. Provide instruction on operating system and user file backup.
  8. Provide instruction on getting help online and in the operating system.

5.4 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during operating system options, features, and maintenance training.

  1. The consumer can locate the control panel—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can open folders and files on the C: drive—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can use cut and paste to move files from removable storage—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can perform basic system maintenance, such as disk cleanup and disk defragmentation—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can use system restore—Yes or No.

Chapter 6: Screen Readers

6.1 Screen Reader (12 to 15 Hours)

Teach the use of screen readers using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Operating Systems).
  2. If applicable, provide instruction on installing software including selecting a custom or automatic installation.
  3. Provide instruction on changing default configurations, including
    • installing and changing synthesizers (internal, external, or software type);
    • installing drivers for braille displays (if applicable);
    • modifying and customizing voice parameters;
    • setting up verbosity levels, user options, keyboard voice, and cursor voice; and
    • selecting application settings.
  4. Provide instruction on the special commands for reading functions for document, line, word, sentence, paragraph, active control, font attributes, and cursor status.
  5. Explain the cursor, the virtual cursor, and the mouse cursor including practice using the invisible cursor to read the status bar and other parts of the screen.
  6. Provide instruction on getting help online and in the software, including the use of
    • hot key help,
    • screen-sensitive help, and
    • keyboard help.

6.2 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during screen reader training.

  1. The consumer can load and unload the appropriate software and set defaults properly—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can modify verbosity options for each application—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can explain the differences between the virtual cursor, the mouse cursor, the invisible cursor, and the PC cursor—Yes or No.
  4. If applicable, the consumer can read a word, line, and sentence using the specific keyboard commands of the screen reader—Yes or No.

6.3 Screen Magnification and Screen Review (6 to 8 Hours)

Teach the use of screen magnifiers and screen review using the following steps.

  1. If applicable, review the previous lesson (Screen Readers).
  2. Provide instruction on starting and closing the screen magnification software.
  3. Provide instruction on customizing the magnifier including
    • setting the size, window option, and contrast;
    • customizing the cursor, mouse, and attributes; and
    • saving changes to the default settings.
  4. Provide instruction on setting up and saving application-specific settings for word processors, Web browsers, etc.
  5. Provide instruction on panning the screen using the keyboard commands.
  6. Provide instruction on using large print with speech support including
    • disabling and enabling the speech component;
    • changing the rate, pitch, or voice in the speech window;
    • using the continuous reading tools;
    • setting the mouse echo options; and
    • setting program verbosity.
  7. Provide instruction on advanced features such as
    • using built-in screen reading commands (keyboard use only), and
    • viewing a list of links.
  8. Provide instruction on getting help online (including using the online user’s guide) and in the program.

6.4 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during screen magnification and screen review training.

  1. The consumer can load and remove the appropriate software and set desired defaults—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can open the adaptive software window, change the settings (contrast, size, and cursor attributes), and save his or her settings—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can magnify a selected portion of the screen—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can modify the speech component within the software—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can access the appropriate Web site for software information—Yes or No.
  6. The consumer can use continuous tools to read a document or Web page—Yes or No.

6.5 Braille Access (5 to 7 Hours)

Teach braille access using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Screen Magnification and Screen Review).
  2. Provide instruction on how the braille display interacts with the screen reader.
  3. Practice customizing the braille display to work with or without speech.
  4. Provide instruction on the input capability of braille displays and their limitations.
  5. Provide instruction on using thumb keys and other navigation keys and features of the front panel.
  6. Provide instruction on the different methods of cursor movement and location, including practice
    • controlling the cursor with the cursor routing keys, and
    • using the keyboard to move the braille cursor.
  7. Provide instruction on different techniques for reading through a file including
    • reading a single character, word, or line at a time;
    • reading through a document using the scroll mode; and
    • reading through a document by line, sentence, or paragraph, or by “panning the display,” as applicable.

6.6 Performance Objectives and Measurments

Measure the following during braille access training.

  1. The consumer can operate his or her computer system with or without speech, and with or without braille—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can identify the need for drivers to be loaded for the display to work—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can operate all the keys on the front panel of the display—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can move the cursor and use cursor routing keys—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can read a file using different methods—Yes or No.

6.7 Speech Recognition Access (60 to 90 hours)

Before beginning this unit, verify that the consumer's motor skills are impaired enough to prevent the use of a standard keyboard. It should take 60 hours for large print users and 90 hours for screen reader users to complete this training.

Teach speech recognition access using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Braille Access).
  2. Provide instruction on how to integrate the screen reader or large print software with the voice-recognition software.
  3. Provide instruction on how to train the software for individualized voice recognition (20 hours to complete) including
    • improving the recognition of the consumer’s voice over time, and
    • saving voice files when the best response is achieved.
  4. Review using Windows features, including desktop, start menu, tabs, and taskbar selections and navigating menus and various types of boxes.
  5. Provide practice adding text to a word processing file.
  6. Provide instruction on manipulating text within a file including
    • using reading commands to read words, lines, and paragraphs;
    • editing text on the screen; and
    • formatting text in a file.
  7. Provide practice using speech input to get help within the software.

Chapter 7: The Word Processor

7.1 Introduction to Word Processing (10 to 15 hours)

Introduce word processing using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Screen Readers).
  2. Introduce the functions of word processors.
  3. Provide practice navigating window-menus, toolbars, and program settings including
    • activating and exiting toolbars, menus, and tabs; and
    • moving between ribbons and tabs.
  4. Provide practice using navigation commands within a document including
    • navigating by word, line, and paragraph;
    • finding the top and end of documents, and the beginning and end of lines;
    • using Page Up and Page Down to move by section and page; and
    • inserting a page break.
  5. Provide instruction on working with documents including
    • opening an existing document;
    • saving a document to the default folder;
    • changing view (for example, draft, print, or outline);
    • switching between documents; and
    • closing documents.
  6. Provide instruction and practice formatting text including
    • selecting text by word, line, paragraph, and document;
    • changing font, font size, italic, bold, underline, and highlighting;
    • inserting text using typeover and insert function; and
    • cutting, copying, deleting, and pasting text within a document.
  7. Provide instruction on printing options and print preview, and practice printing
    • a single page,
    • the current page, and
    • more than one copy of a document.
  8. Provide practice finding help on various topics from the help menu within the word processor.
  9. If applicable, provide instruction on retrieving program-specific help from the assistive software help menu.

7.2 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during the introduction to word processing.

  1. The consumer can launch and close the word processor—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can open a new document and an existing document—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can move the cursor within a document—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can navigate by line, word, paragraph, and page—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can explain document viewing options—Yes or No.
  6. The consumer can print documents—Yes or No.
  7. The consumer can access the help menu and locate the appropriate information—Yes or No.

7.3 Intermediate Word Processing (10 to 15 hours)

Teach intermediate word processing using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Introduction to Word Processing).
  2. Provide instruction on formatting within the word processor including
    • changing the page margins;
    • changing page orientation;
    • changing text alignment and justification (center, left, and right aligning and full justification); and
    • changing the space between lines and paragraphs.
  3. Practice formatting text including font settings and attributes.
  4. Practice spell check and grammar check by
    • exploring the spell check dialog box and the commands Ignore All, Add to Dictionary, Change, Ignore, and Change All;
    • identifying types of errors such as extra spaces, missing spaces, capitalization errors, and misspelled words;
    • making corrections within the spell check dialog box;
    • changing options to include grammar check;
    • resetting options to recheck document; and
    • accessing word count and reading statistics.
  5. Provide instruction on find and replace including
    • using the feature to find and replace text, and
    • using the Page Up and Page Down keys after the find and replace feature.

7.4 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during intermediate word processing training.

  1. The consumer can change the page margins and orientation—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can change the font type and size—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can set line spacing to double-spaced—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can check spelling within a document—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can use the find and replace feature—Yes or No.

7.5 Advanced Word Processing (4 to 6 hours)

Teach advanced word processing using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Intermediate Word Processing).
  2. Provide instruction on advanced editing functions Including
    • styles,
    • sections, and
    • columns
  3. Provide instruction on page numbers, headers, and footers.
  4. Practice working with tables including
    • inserting a table;
    • choosing a table layout;
    • copying and pasting a table into a document;
    • converting table to text, and text to table;
    • moving the cursor within cells;
    • inserting cells, columns, and rows;
    • removing cells, columns, and rows; and,
    • deleting a table.
  5. Practice working with lists including
    • creating a bulleted list, and
    • creating a numbered list.
  6. Provide instruction on creating address labels and envelopes.

7.6 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during advanced word processing training.

  1. The consumer can check the spelling and grammar in a document—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can set page numbers—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can insert lists, tables, headers, and footers within a document—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can create a numbered list—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can create a multicolumn document—Yes or No.
  6. The consumer can address an envelope and create address labels—Yes or No.

Chapter 8: Scanning and Embossing

8.1 Scanner Connected to a Computer (6 to 8 hours)

Teach scanning with a system scanner using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (The Word Processor).
  2. Provide instruction on how to operate a scanner that is attached to a computer and uses assistive optical character recognition (OCR) software.
  3. Explain the relationship between the speech component of the scanning software and the screen reader.
  4. Practice customizing the speech output in the scanning software.
  5. Explore the scanning functions within the assistive software including
    • scanning a document and reading by word, line, and paragraph;
    • scanning in the background; and
    • advanced reading and scanning options.
  6. Practice editing a document including
    • saving an edited file, and
    • importing and exporting documents.
  7. Provide instruction on modifying and setting the screen magnification options in the assistive software.

8.2 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during scanner training.

  1. The consumer can control speech output and understands how the scanner and screen reader work together—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can select different scanning options within the assistive software, scan documents, and save files in different formats—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can use the arrow keys to read scanned documents by word, line, and paragraph—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can edit scanned material and save it to a folder, removable storage device, or disc—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can set the screen magnification options—Yes or No.

8.3 Stand-Alone Scanners (4 to 6 hours)

Teach scanning with a stand-alone scanner using the following steps.

Provide instruction on

  1. Using the control panel or keypad on the scanner including.
    • practice using the scanning and reading functions of the keypad; and
    • practice setting the voice controls including speed, pitch, rate, and voice.
  2. Provide instruction on how to retrieve files and save files to a folder, removable storage device, or disc.

8.4 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during stand-alone scanner training.

  1. The consumer can read through scanned text (by word, line, and paragraph) using the keypad—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can save scanned text as a file to a folder, removable storage device, or disc—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can retrieve and read files from a folder, removable storage device, or disc —Yes or No.

8.5 Embossing with Braille Translation Software (up to 4 to 6 hours)

Teach braille embossing using the following steps.

  1. Provide instruction on installing and getting oriented to the braille embosser.
  2. Provide practice loading paper into the embosser and choosing the single- or double-sided mode.
  3. Provide instruction on setting the top of the form.
  4. Provide instruction on operating the keypad or control panel on the embosser.
  5. Provide instruction on the uses of braille translation software.
  6. Provide practice translating a document into braille.
  7. Explore the pull-down menus.
  8. Provide instruction on editing a document before printing including
    • importing a document,
    • editing the text version, and
    • editing the braille version.
  9. Provide instruction on formatting and embossing a document including
    • formatting a document using codes and styles,
    • choosing uncontracted (Grade 1) or contracted (Grade 2) braille,
    • translating and embossing a braille document, and
    • using shortcuts to emboss documents.

8.6 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during braille embossing training.

  1. The consumer can use the keypad, control panel, and other switches on the front panel to program the braille embosser—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can load a text document, and format and edit it for braille embossing—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can emboss a correctly formatted document in contracted (Grade 2) braille—Yes or No.

Chapter 9: Notetakers

9.1 Introduction to Notetakers (3 to 6 hours)

Introduce notetakers using the following steps.

  1. Explain the architecture of the notetaker software (linear structure or Windows type).
  2. Provide instruction on the external features of the device including ports, jacks, and chargers.
  3. Provide instruction on changing speech parameters.
  4. Provide instruction on accessing and using the help menus.
  5. Provide instruction on file management including
    • creating, opening, and deleting files and folders; and
    • moving through a list of files and folders and renaming them.
  6. Provide instruction on reading in a file including
    • reading by word, sentence, and line; and
    • using spell mode.
  7. Provide instruction on writing functions including
    • entering and deleting text, and
    • using find and replace.
  8. Provide practice locating the cursor.
  9. For notetakers with refreshable braille display, provide instruction on locating the braille cursor.
  10. Provide practice reading a file using the braille display.
  11. Provide instruction on using the cursor routing keys.
  12. Provide instruction on how to navigate the device menus such as pull-down, file, and status menus.

9.2 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during the introduction to notetakers.

  1. The consumer can locate the charger, jacks, and ports on the notetaker—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can change the rate, pitch, and frequency of speech—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can create, delete, and rename files and folders—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can read, write, and edit text within a file—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can locate the braille cursor on notetakers with a braille display, if applicable—Yes or No.
  6. The consumer can use the braille display to “pan” the display and read by word, line, and paragraph—Yes or No.
  7. The consumer can use the cursor routing keys—Yes or No.
  8. The consumer can navigate notetaker menus—Yes or No.

9.3 Advanced Functions of Notetakers (2 to 4 hours)

Teach the following during advanced notetaker training.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Introduction to Notetakers).
  2. Provide instruction on using removable media with the notetaker including
    • saving to and retrieving from removable media;
    • backing up files to removable media; and
    • saving files in braille, text, or other format supported by the notetaker.
  3. If applicable, provide instruction on connecting the notetaker to other devices including
    • uploading and downloading files from a computer, and
    • sending files to a printer.
  4. Provide instruction on miscellaneous functions of the notetaker including
    • setting the time and date,
    • using the calculator,
    • using the address book for contact information, and
    • formatting documents.

9.4 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during advanced notetaker training.

  1. The consumer can save to and retrieve from alternative or removable media—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can connect and operate the notetaker effectively with a printer and a computer—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can set the date and time, operate the calculator, and enter contact information into the address book—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can format documents—Yes or No.

Chapter 10: The Internet

10.1 Getting Started on the Internet (2 to 4 hours)

Introduce the Internet using the following steps.

  1. Explain the concept of Internet communication and the concept of logging off.
  2. Provide instruction on connecting to the Internet, which may include
    • using a dial-up or broadband connection;
    • using the Internet Connection Wizard;
    • connecting to an Internet service provider (ISP);
    • entering and changing passwords; and
    • using, saving, and changing Web browser settings.
  3. Provide instruction on using, changing, and saving assistive technology related settings.

10.2 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during the introduction to the Internet.

  1. The consumer can select an Internet service provider—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can set up an Internet connection, if applicable—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can successfully connect to and disconnect from the Internet, if applicable—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can change a password—Yes or No.
  5. The consumer can use, change, and save assistive technology related settings—Yes or No.

10.3 Communicating by Email (3 to 5 hours)

Teach communicating by email using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Getting Started on the Internet).
  2. Provide instruction on choosing email software and setting up an email account including
    • creating an address book, and
    • using, changing, and saving email program settings.
  3. Provide practice using email including
    • sending and receiving messages;
    • saving, deleting, and archiving messages;
    • forwarding messages and replying to sender; and
    • attaching files.
  4. Provide instruction on setting up and managing personal folders.

10.4 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during communicating by email training.

  1. The consumer can set up an email account and address book—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can send, delete, archive, save, and forward messages as well as attaching files—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can set up and manage personal folders—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can use, change, and save email program settings—Yes or No.

10.5 Exploring the World Wide Web (4 to 6 hours)

Teach exploring the World Wide Web using the following steps.

  1. Review the previous lesson (Communicating by Email).
  2. Provide instruction on designating and browsing a home page.
  3. Provide practice finding a specific Web page.
  4. Provide instruction on browsing a Web page including
    • using assistive technology commands to navigate links,
    • using assistive technology to read a Web site with multiple frames, and
    • filling in a form using assistive technology.
  5. Provide instruction on downloading files from the Web and installing applications (if applicable).
  6. Provide instruction on creating a list of favorites.
  7. Provide instruction on designing a simple Web site.

10.6 Performance Objectives and Measurements

Measure the following during World Wide Web training.

  1. The consumer can easily navigate links on the home page—Yes or No.
  2. The consumer can locate a Web site and navigate it efficiently using assistive technology—Yes or No.
  3. The consumer can set up a list of favorite Web sites—Yes or No.
  4. The consumer can design a simple Web site—Yes or No.

Chapter 11: Post-Training Assessment

11.1 Purpose of the Post-Training Assessment

A post-training assessment is necessary to evaluate the consumer’s assistive technology skills after training is complete.

11.2 Conducting the Post-Training Assessment

The post-training assessment is conducted by the EAS specialist, VRC, or AT trainer after training is complete and is used to determine training effectiveness and assess whether the consumer requires additional training. On average, each assessment takes two to four hours to complete. The EAS specialist, VRC, or designee may observe the post-training assessment. The post-training assessment is documented on form DARS2902 and is listed as a separate line item on the purchase order.

11.3 Elements of the Post-Training Assessment

Complete form DARS2902 for the post-training assessment. The following must be included in the assessment.

  1. Review the consumer’s training objectives and goals.
  2. Conduct performance tests on the training modules that have been covered.
  3. Evaluate the consumer’s performance on job-related applications using assistive technology.
  4. Verify that the consumer can
    • identify software and hardware problems, and
    • communicate the problems to the appropriate technical support.
  5. Verify that reports document the consumer’s overall competencies including, but not limited to, the following skills.
    • The consumer can identify and define hardware such as monitors, CPU, disk drives, and removable media.
    • The consumer understands software types such as word processors, screen readers, screen magnifiers, and assistive software.
    • The consumer can identify the important elements of the extended keyboard including the ESC key, function keys, numeric keypad, six-pack keypad, Ctrl keys, Alt keys, and Windows logo key.
    • The consumer can execute multikey commands using Shift, Ctrl, Alt, and F6.
    • The consumer consistently types 30 words per minute or faster.

Chapter 12: Trainer Dos and Don'ts

12.1 Do

The following are best practices for assistive technology trainers.

  • Do be prepared and on time for appointments.
  • Do dress neatly.
  • Do manage your travel time so the consumer gets the most out of a day's training.
  • Do complete written training reports in the required format.
  • Do submit a written training report within 10 working days after the training is completed.
  • Do be courteous to the consumer at all times (if you have a problem related to the consumer's behavior, contact the counselor immediately).
  • Do use the curricula described in this manual.
  • Do provide only the training that has been requested.
  • Do reinforce the use of vendor technology help lines and the need to back up files.
  • Do contact the counselor or EAS immediately if you discover a problem with the consumer’s equipment, hardware, or software.
  • Do provide the consumer with electronic copies of any changes or additions to the desktop setup, keyboard shortcuts, scripts, sets, or other configuration files, including customized settings for the assistive software.

12.2 Don't

The following practices are prohibited for assistive technology trainers.

  • Don't talk about other consumers.
  • Don't criticize the Division for Blind Services or DBS staff members.
  • Don't tell the consumer that he or she needs newer, additional, or upgraded equipment or software.
  • Don't install anything (software or hardware) unless the counselor or EAS has requested or authorized it.
  • Don’t recommend additional training or additional training time to the consumer.
  • Don’t solicit the consumer for services or business.
  • Don't bring your children, driver, or other people into the training environment.
  • Don't alter any DBS form when training DBS staff members.

12.3 Things to Remember

If you think the consumer would benefit from additional equipment, software, or training, state this in your report, but do not discuss it with the consumer. Doing so can set up unrealistic expectations for the consumer.

If you notice performance issues such as a consumer’s unfamiliarity with the keyboard or inability to grasp required concepts, contact the counselor or EAS immediately.

If the consumer becomes belligerent or abusive, leave the training site immediately and contact the counselor or EAS.

Chapter 13: Training Expectations

It is critical that you know what training outcomes the counselor or EAS and the consumer expect. It is equally important that you identify and clarify any differences between these expectations before training starts.

In order for you to be fully prepared to begin training when you arrive at the training site, you must know

When the counselor or EAS refers a consumer for training, be sure to ask what equipment the consumer has received. The consumer’s DARS2014, Rehabilitation Equipment Receipt and Agreement can tell you what equipment has been ordered. You should also discuss the results of the consumer’s baseline assessment (an assessment of the consumer’s current technology skills), if available; the training goals that have been identified; and which training modules you should concentrate on. You may also request information from the Initial Consultation Report or Assistive Technology Evaluation Report, which might provide insight on the consumer’s goals and skills.

You should contact the consumer before you start training to discuss his or her understanding of training expectations and goals. During training the consumer may ask for installation of (or training on) hardware or software that he or she has purchased. Unless you receive prior written permission from the counselor or EAS, do not install or train on any hardware or software (for example, games) unless it is in the referral. Contact the referring counselor, EAS, or back-up counselor to report any issues that arise with the consumer’s computer system whether or not the computer is state-issued.

Assistive technology software may require some time to load or customize configuration files before you can actually start working with the consumer; however, this preparation should not occupy the bulk of the consumer’s training time.

Provide training only on the products, hardware, and software that are on your approved list. If you are asked by a DBS staff member, counselor, or consumer to provide training in other areas, you must inform the requester that you are not allowed to do so.

All requests for training should be in writing. If the counselor requests an exception to approved training, the request must be in writing and approved by the field director. You are expected to be an expert, and you cannot use the consumer’s equipment, software, hardware, or time to learn the program.

Do not use the consumer’s equipment to check your email or conduct personal business. Remember, you are there to provide one-on-one training. Do not place or answer personal calls during training time.

Chapter 14: Training Reports

14.1 Information in the Training Report

Assistive technology training reports are sent to the consumer’s counselor and/or the EAS who completed the EAS consultation report and placed it in the consumer's file. Consumers may review your reports upon request.

Write an objective assessment of the training experience and include any problems the consumer may have (slow typing, eye fatigue, memory problems, etc.). Avoid making assumptions about the consumer; instead, state facts based on what you observed during training.

If you encounter something that you think should be mentioned but you do not wish to include it in your written report, contact the counselor or EAS by phone to discuss the issue.

Do not, under any circumstances, indicate to the consumer that he or she may need additional hardware or software, even if you think that is true. These issues should be discussed only with the counselor or EAS. Any recommendations made for additional equipment must be supported by training occurrences. Document any customization or modification that you make to the consumer’s computer or assistive technology, as well as how or where you provided relevant information to the consumer.

14.2 Guidelines for Submitting Reports by Email

Reports submitted by email must meet the following guidelines.

  • Send interim reports and final training reports by email to the counselor and EAS specialist who completed the consultation report.
  • Include the counselor’s caseload number.
  • Complete all reports using a Form 2868, Assistive Technology Training Report and include all required information. (For more information, see the sample training report.
  • Do not use the consumer's Social Security number on email reports.
  • Do not use the consumer's complete name. Use only the consumer's first name and last initial. In the body of the report use "consumer" or first name only.

14.3 Report Requirements

Assistive technology training reports must meet the following requirements.

  • All training reports must be prepared using a DARS2868, Consumer Services Report: Assistive Technology Training Report.
  • Training reports for DBS consumers must be submitted to the counselor and the EAS specialist who completed the consultation report within 10 working days after the training is completed.
  • Training reports for DBS staff members must be submitted to their supervisors within 10 working days after the training is completed.
  • If consumer training continues beyond one 30-day period, the trainer must submit an interim report to the consumer's counselor for each 30-day period.

Call ATU at (512) 377-0310 or Mark Eastland, in-house services manager, at (512) 377-0691 if you have questions.